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Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs)

AEDs: Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to the most frequently asked questions about automatic external defibrillators (AEDs).

Starting a Community-Based AED Program: A Checklist

There are fourteen steps to starting and running an AED program in your community.

Automated External Defibrillators: The Basics

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are lightweight, portable, computerized, battery-operated devices used to restore a regular heartbeat after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

School-Based AED Programs Save Lives, Study Shows

HIgh-school AED programs demonstrate a high survival rate for students as well as adults who suffer sudden cardiac arrest on school campuses, says a new study, which strongly recommends school-based AED programmes as an important public safety measure and an effective strategy for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

CPR Training for Parents: Why It's Important and What You Should Know

Nearly 350,000 people suffer cardiac arrest annually.   Because cardiac arrest leads to the death of one youth athlete every three days in the United States, sports parents should know how to perform CPR and use an AED, which can significantly increase a victim's chances of survival.

Safety Comes First, No Matter Sport or Season

The winter sports season is in full swing, and spring sports are a ways off, but safety comes first, no matter what the sport or the season. Here's a sixteen-point safety checklist to keep athletes in the game.

Many U.S. High Schools Unprepared For Cardiac Emergency

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of sudden death in exercising young athletes, but despite data showing that early defibrillation with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can save nearly two-thirds of student-athletes who suffer SCA, many U.S. high schools are not prepared to respond to an SCA or have significant deficiencies that could be improved, a new study finds.

Eric Laudano (Athletic Trainer): His Quick Action Saved A Coach's Life


In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from Eric Laudano, Head Athletic Trainer and Manager of Sports Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a MomsTeam expert.

By Eric Laudano, M.H.S, ATC

It's not every day that an athletic trainer gets to save a life, but that's exactly what happened when he was callled to help a college coach lying unconscious, not breathing, and without a pulse in the parking lot outside the school's basketball center.

Athletes Saving Athletes: The Name Says It All

After a certified athletic trainer saved Tommy Mallon's life when he suffered a spinal fracture in his last high school lacrosse game,  his mom Beth started Advocates for Injured Athletes and began a pilot program called Athletes Saving Athletes to train high school athletes about head and neck injuries, sudden cardiac arrest, heat illness, diabetes, and asthma.

Preventing Commotio Cordis in Youth Baseball

Young baseball and softball players who receive direct ball impact to the chest wall directly over the heart may develop sudden cardiac arrest, a condition called commotio cordis.  Teaching batters to turn away from an inside pitch, and pitchers to react as quickly as possible to a batted ball hit back at them can help reduce the risk, and an AED and a someone trained in CPR should be on-site.
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