Home » Sports

Sports

Impact Sensors: Frequently Asked Questions

The last several years, however, have seen a growing number of companies introduce to the consumer market the first generation of impact sensors intended for real time monitoring of impacts to the heads of athletes in actual games and practices.

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Safe Weight Loss and Maintenance Practices in Sports and Exercise

As part of an ongoing effort to highlight safe weight loss and weight management practices among active people and athletes at all levels, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has released a new position statement on "Safe Weight Loss and Maintenance Practices in Sport and Exercise."

Cheerleading Safety Checklist

There has been an explosion in the number of cheerleading injuries in recent years.  Safety experts, including the NCCSIR, the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators (AACCA), and the National Cheer Safety Foundation, suggest twelve steps to help prevent cheerleading injuries.

Youth Ice Hockey Safety Tips

Each year, almost 87,000 hockey-related injuries to youths under age 15 are treated in hospitals, doctors' offices, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers and hospital emergency rooms. The total cost of these hockey-related injuries was more than $978 million in 2006. This amount includes medical, legal and liability, work loss, and pain and suffering costs.

2014 Little League Pitch Count Limits and Mandatory Rest Rules

Revised pitch count limits, longer mandatory rest periods, and other rule changes implemented by Little League Baseball in 2010 to reduce shoulder and elbow overuse injuries to youth baseball pitchers remain in effect for 2014.

Little League Rules Protect Pitchers' Arms

In 2007, Little League Baseball dropped its decades-old pitching rules - which limited pitchers age 12 and under to six innings per week and six innings per game, with the number of innings increasing for older age groups in favor of rules based on pitch count, with the number of allowable pitches based on the pitcher's age and with specific rest periods between pitching appearances when a pitcher reaches higher thresholds of pitches delivered in a day.  Revised rules go into effect for the spring 2010 baseball season.

Buying Baseball Equipment

Baseball requires more protective equipment than many sports.  To play baseball, each team needs baseballs, bats, batting helmets, and bases, and each player, of course, needs a glove.

Preventing Injuries in Youth Baseball

Of the nearly 500,000 youth baseball injuries treated in hospitals, doctors' offices, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers and hospital emergency rooms each year, many are preventable or could be reduced in severity if simple steps are taken.

Preventing Pitching Injuries in Youth Baseball

Twelve ways to reduce the risk of baseball pitching injuries from overuse, poor pitching mechanics, and/or poor conditioning.

Syndicate content