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Team Culture Is Reflected In Its Attention To Detail


Top teams have a strong culture which is nurtured by coaches and team officials.

It could be described as a "How we do business, here" attitude, one deeply rooted in the leaders' values and beliefs about what is important to run a successful youth sports program.

A program's values and beliefs are on display every day in the form of team communications, attention to detail, group dynamics, and the decisions that the coaches make.  

Top teams have a strong culture which is nurtured by coaches and team officials. A longtime hockey coach explains how a team's culture and values is often reflected in its attention to the smallest detail.

Deb Bowen: "Aha" Moment After Son's Injury Inspired Career Teaching Yoga To Teen Athletes

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam is again asking our friends in the health, fitness, nutrition and athletic training communities to write blogs answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from certified yoga instructor, Deb Bowen. 

A sports mom tells how she was inspired by her son's overuse injury to become a certified yoga teacher so she could bring the physical and mental benefits of yoga to teen athletes.

Don Hooton: Making A Difference In The Fight Against Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs

Two years ago, in recognition of April as Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.  

Today, we are honored to hear the story of Don Hooton, Sr. of the Taylor Hooton Foundation, which is working to educate America's youth and adult influencers about the dangers of Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drugs.

National Youth Sports Safety Month: Some Progress, But Still A Long Way To Go

By Brooke de Lench

A solid foundation 

When the non-profit 501(c)(3) National Youth Sports Safety Foundation (NYSSF) was formed in 1989, its mission was to provide information on the prevention of youth sports injuries. It got its start after Rita Glassman's young daughter Michelle suffered a severe back injury which ended her tennis career. Rita was the first to designate April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, which MomsTeam has been celebrating every year since 2001.

In celebration of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTEAM is re-posting many of the blog entries contributed in 2012 by some our favorite sports medicine and safety experts and sprinkling in some new ones.

Youth Sports Heroes of the Month: Overland High School (Aurora, Colo.) Girls Soccer Team

 

When the Overland High School Trailblazers opened their varsity soccer season against the Fairview High School Knights on March 12, the girls were short one player. The referees sidelined Trailblazer Samah Aidah as a result of a pre-game ruling that her hijab, a headscarf worn by Muslim women as a sign of modesty and devotion, created an alleged "danger." Aurora Colorado girls soccer team wearing hajibs

When a referee sidelined Overland High School soccer player Samah Aidah because her hijab allegedly created a "danger," her teammates expressed their solidarity at their next game by all wearing hajibs. 

On The Road Again: A Report From The Concussion Summit Trail

 

For those of you wondering where I have been lately, I have been taking a break from blogging and writing because of a heavy speaking and consulting schedule, because I have been busy working on updating our documentary, "The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer" with new edits and information in time for broadcast in the summer and fall 2014, and because  I have been preoccupied with getting our new 501(c)(3) non-profit, MomsTEAM Institute, off to a good start.

Brooke has been taking a break from blogging and writing because of a heavy speaking and consulting schedule, and to work on updating the PBS documentary, "The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer" with new edits and information in time for broadcast in the summer and fall 2014, and because she has been hard at work getting her new 501(c)(3) non-profit, MomsTEAM Institute, off to a good start.

Last Dance: Reflections of A Dance Mom

Dedicated to the Parents of the Class of 2014 who have seen their

child’s last pass, catch, pitch, serve, goal, basket, cheer,  tumble, at bat, or dance.

The plane touched down in Orlando Florida. The trip that I had been looking forward to, as well as dreading for many years, was finally here. My daughter’s drill team was competing in the Contest of Champions with drill teams, state champions all, from all over the nation vying for national honors. 

A mom looks back on her daughter's years of dance and as part of a drill team.

Disciplining Youth Sports Coaches: Lots of Factors To Consider

My March "Youth Sports Hero of the Month" column honored 12-year-old Matthew Marotta for his sportsmanship at the end of a hard-fought pee wee hockey tournament game in Winnipeg, Manitoba on February 16.

For readers who might not have read that blog entry yet, the Nanaimo Clippers edged Matthew's Prince George Cougars, 3-2, on a hotly disputed goal in the final moments of double overtime.Youth hockey player watching action from bench

In his March Youth Sports Hero of the Month blog, Doug Abrams honored 12-year-old Matthew Marotta for his sportsmanship at the end of a hard-fought pee wee hockey tournament game in Winnipeg, Manitoba.   In this post, the former youth hockey coach focuses on the factors sports leagues should weigh in considering disciplinary measures against a coach, using the Marotta incident as a jumping off point.

Youth Sports Hero of the Month: Matthew Marotta (Prince George, British Columbia)

 

On Sunday, February 16, the Nanaimo (B.C.) Clippers edged the Prince George Cougars, 3-2, on a hotly disputed goal in the final moments of a hard-fought double-overtime pee wee hockey tournament game in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The victory moved the Tier I Clippers into fifth place in the 43rd annual Vernon Coca-Cola Invitational.  

When a pee wee hockey team lost in controversial fashion in overtime, the coach decided not to go through the traditional post-game handshake line to congratulate the winners. Except for one player, who shook his head when his head coach called him to leave the ice with the rest of his team.

Research Papers and Peer-Reviewed Studies: A World of Difference

 

Last week, we posted to the site a group of four articles about a peer-reviewed study in the Journal of Neurosurgery showing that football helmet design affected concussion risk among a large group (or what scientists call a "cohort") of college football players.

Last week, we reported on a peer-reviewed study showing that football helmet design affected concussion risk. At the same time, we received a press release about an abstract of a research paper on football helmets reporting that they do very little to protect kids against the rotational forces that cause concussion.  MomsTEAM decided not to report on the paper, and here's why.

 

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