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Concussion Safety

Impact Sensors: Frequently Asked Questions

The last several years have seen a growing number of companies introduce to the consumer market the first generation of impact sensors intended for real time monitoring of impacts to the heads of athletes in actual games and practices. Here are our answers to the most frequently asked questions about sensors.

Seven Ways To Reduce Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury In Sports

Brain trauma to youth and high school players in contact and collision sports can occur not just from violent helmet-on-helmet collisions but from repetitive sub-concussive blows.  There are five major ways to reduce exposure to such hits, experts say.

Pop Warner Settlement: Seismic Shift In Legal Landscape Or Just A Warning Shot?

Three attorneys - a law professor, a high school interscholastic sports commissioner, and a practicing attorney with a speciality in sports law - discuss the impact of the recent settlement by Pop Warner of a suit involving a 13-year player rendered a quadriplegic after a helmet-to-helmet collision.

Helmetless Tackling and Blocking Drills Lead to Decreased Head Impacts in College Football Players

Engaging in a 5-minute helmetless tackling drill twice a week during pre-season football and once a week during the season reduced by almost a third the frequency of impacts to the head over the course of a single season, reports a groundbreaking new study.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Concussion Education For Youth Football Parents

Elizabeth M. Pieroth, Psy.D, a Board Certified Neuropsychologist, and Associate Director of the Sports Concussion Program at the NorthShore Medical Group, talks about concussions in youth football in this comprehensive and informative half-hour presentation to parents in Grand Prairie, Texas.

Pediatrics Group's Position on Tackling in Youth Football Strikes Right Balance

Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced. The AAP likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18, unwilling to recommend at this time such a fundamental change in the way the game is played.

As someone who has been working for 15 years to make youth football safer, MomsTEAM's Executive Director was glad to see the nation's largest and most prestigious pediatrics group support so many of the evidence- and expert consensus-based recommendations MomsTEAM has been making to improve the safety of the game.

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.
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