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Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

Athletes Saving Athletes Program Gains NATA Support

The National Athletic Trainers' Association is now an official supporter of Advocates for Injured Athletes and its Athletes Saving AthletesTM program, which provides high school students with training and skills to recognize signs and symptoms of life-threatening injuries, with the aim of reducing the risk and incidence of injury and death among student-athletes.

NATA Issues 2010 Report Card on Youth Sports Safety

With the support of 40 sports and health organizations, including MomsTeam.com, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has issued a C+ grade on youth sports safety for 2010, reporting that 48 young athletes died since the beginning of the year, with sudden cardiac arrest accounting for nearly half of those deaths, brain injury (concussion) for three, heat illness three, and exertional sickling (a result of sickle cell trait) one. Approximately 8,000 children are treated in emergency rooms each day for sports-related injuries. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, high school athletes suffer 2 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations each year.

High School Football Players Most Prone to Heat Illness, CDC Says

U.S. high school athletes suffer an estimated 9,237 time-loss heat illnesses every year that are serious enough to keep them out of sports for one or more days, according to a new, first-of-its kind report from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC), with football players most prone to heat illness.
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