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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

Impact Sensors: Frequently Asked Questions

The last several years have seen a growing number of companies introduce to the consumer market the first generation of impact sensors intended for real time monitoring of impacts to the heads of athletes in actual games and practices. Here are our answers to the most frequently asked questions about sensors.

Impact Sensors: Many Benefits Of Real-Time Monitoring

The best way to combat under-reporting and increase the chances a concussion will be identified early on the sports sideline may be through real-time monitoring of head impact exposure to identify high-risk impacts and alert medical personnel on the sideline to the possible need to perform a concussion assessment.

Concussion Evaluation and Management Involves Many Factors

The current international consensus statement on concussion in sport lists a range of factors that may influence the evaluation and management of concussion, in some cases predicting the potential for a prolonged recovery, but other guidelines, and some studies, list different risk factors.

Concussion Checklist for Parents

MomsTeam Founder and long-time concussion safety advocate, Brooke de Lench, provides a concussion safety checklist for parents to know their child's sports program is taking concussions seriously.

Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.

 

Is A Child's Headache The Day After A Football Game Cause For Concern? You Be The Judge

 

"Mom, I still have a headache." If you are a mom of a teenager, you probably hear them say that every day for various reasons. Life is tough when you are 13- or 14-years-old. You study too much, or you watch too much TV, or play too many video games. You get dehydrated from sports or just stressed by peers and hormones. You get headaches. Who knows why? A headache isn't a big deal, right? So why on this Wednesday morning did my son's announcement send an icy shiver down my spine? That he plays his 8th grade football games on Tuesday nights, that's why!

When her son announces that he still had a headache after his football game the night before, a Texas mom springs into action. Did she do the right thing? You be the judge.

AFL Becomes First Professional Sports League to Require Helmet Impact Sensors

The Arena Football League (AFL), in partnership with Brain Sentry, has become the first professional sports league to require helmet-mounted impact sensors to alert sideline personnel to hits that may cause concussion.

Sideline-Dropstick Test: A Simple Measure of Reaction Time To Help Identify Athletes With Possible Concussion?

A simple, easy-to-construct and easy-to-use dropstick device to measure reaction time, which is impaired after concussion, could help sideline personnel identify athletes to remove from play because of possible concussion, and in concussion assessment and management.

NATA Issues New Concussion Position Statement

The National Athletic Trainers' Association has released a new position statement on the management of sport concussion. The statement is an update to the NATA's original 2004 concussion guidelines and addresses education, prevention, documentation and legal aspects, evaluation and return-to-play considerations. In particular, the authors amended the return-to-play guidelines and now recommend no return on the day the athlete is concussed.

More Evidence That King-Devick Test May Help Identify Concussed Athletes On Sports Sideline

A simple vision test performed on the sports sidelines was able to identify nearly 8 out of 10 athletes later found to have suffered a concussion, and when test results were combined with tests for cognition and balance, allowed identification of concussed athletes with 100% accuracy, according to researchers at New York University.
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