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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

Impact Sensors: Frequently Asked Questions

The last several years have seen a growing number of companies introduce to the consumer market the first generation of impact sensors intended for real time monitoring of impacts to the heads of athletes in actual games and practices. Here are our answers to the most frequently asked questions about sensors.

Impact Sensors: Many Benefits Of Real-Time Monitoring

The best way to combat under-reporting and increase the chances a concussion will be identified early on the sports sideline may be through real-time monitoring of head impact exposure to identify high-risk impacts and alert medical personnel on the sideline to the possible need to perform a concussion assessment.

Concussion Evaluation and Management Involves Many Factors

The current international consensus statement on concussion in sport lists a range of factors that may influence the evaluation and management of concussion, in some cases predicting the potential for a prolonged recovery, but other guidelines, and some studies, list different risk factors.

Concussion Checklist for Parents

MomsTeam Founder and long-time concussion safety advocate, Brooke de Lench, provides a concussion safety checklist for parents to know their child's sports program is taking concussions seriously.

Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.


Traumatic Brain Injury: Lessons Learned From Our Nation's Athletes and Military

Each Veterans Day, the Veterans Clinic at the University of Missouri School of Law holds a symposium exploring a cutting-edge topic important to veterans. This year's day-long symposium, to be held on Wednesday, November 11, 2015, will explore "Traumatic Brain Injury - Lessons Learned From Our Nation's Athletes and Military."

SmartTeams™ Talk: Signs Of Head Injury Requiring Immediate Trip To Emergency Room

A concussed athlete experiencing symptoms such as repeated vomiting, worsening headache, slurred speech or loss of consciousness may have suffered a more serious head injury and should be taken immediately to the emergency room at the nearest hospital.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Coaches Need To Encourage Reporting of Concussion Symptoms; Game Officials Need To Be On The Lookout

Coaches need to create a culture of safety in which self-reporting by athletes of concussion symptoms is encouraged, not discouraged, and they aren't penalized for honest reporting, says neuropsychologist Elizabeth M. Pieroth, Psy.D, Associate Director of the Sports Concussion Program of NorthShore Medical Group and consultant to the Chicago Bears, Blackhawks, White Sox, and Fire. Like coaches, game officials need to be on the lookout for concussion symptoms after an athlete takes a hard hit, such as confusion, imbalance, slowness to respond, or the player can't remember plays. Because they are right in the middle of the action, game officials, she says, are often in a better position than those on the sideline to spot athletes with possible concussion.

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Coaches and Parents: If Concussion Suspected, What To Do Next Is Simple

If a parent, coach, or game official suspects that a player has suffered a concussion playing sports, the player should be removed immediately from play, banned from returning that day, and be sent to be checked out right away by a medical professional. No sideline test, smartphone app or screening tool can help decide whether to allow the athlete to continue playing.
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