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Heat Illness Safety

Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

Exertional Heat Illness Rate Highest In High School Football, Study Finds

There is good news and bad news in a new study on exertional heat illness in high school sports: the bad news is that the rate for football players is 11 times higher that of all other sports combined. The good news is that, despite a rash of heat-related deaths (6 in 2011 alone, all in football), the overall rate of EHI across all high school sports is low and dropping.

Georgia Heat Acclimatization Guidelines

In 2012 Georgia became the sixth state to adopt heat-acclimatization guidelines to reduce the risk of exertional heat stroke among high school athletes.  In adopting  key recommendations from a 2009 statement from the National Athletic Trainers Association, the Georgia High School Association joins Connecticut, New Jersey, Texas and North Carolina.  Since then six other states (Arizona, Florida, Iowa, Utah, Missouri, and Illinois) have adopted the full set of heat recommendations.

High School Football Players Most Prone to Heat Illness, CDC Says

U.S. high school athletes suffer an estimated 9,237 time-loss heat illnesses every year that are serious enough to keep them out of sports for one or more days, according to a new, first-of-its kind report from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC), with football players most prone to heat illness.

Performance Nutrition for Football: Replacing Electrolytes Prevents Muscle Cramps

The loss of electrolytes such as sodium and potassium through sweat can lead to muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting and even death.  Electrolytes are minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chloride) which send messages to nerves and muscles throughout the body,  and are involved with muscle contraction and relaxation during exercise, so that an imbalance can impact the actual contraction of the muscle itself.
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