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Cardiac Safety

AEDs: Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to the most frequently asked questions about automatic external defibrillators (AEDs).

Starting a Community-Based AED Program: A Checklist

There are fourteen steps to starting and running an AED program in your community.

Automated External Defibrillators: The Basics

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are lightweight, portable, computerized, battery-operated devices used to restore a regular heartbeat after sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Standardizing Preparticipation Physical Exams Is Goal Of New NATA Position Statement

A standardized process for conducting the preparticipation physical examination is needed to ensure a safe playing environment for athletes and to help identify those conditions that may predispose an athlete to injury or sudden death, says the National Athletic Trainers' Association in a new position statement.

School-Based AED Programs Save Lives, Study Shows

HIgh-school AED programs demonstrate a high survival rate for students as well as adults who suffer sudden cardiac arrest on school campuses, says a new study, which strongly recommends school-based AED programmes as an important public safety measure and an effective strategy for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

Survey To Collect Data On Health Screening Of Athletes

We've been asked by Gloria Wu, M.D., a physician active in the Sudden Cardiac Death Association of San Jose, California, and an Associate Clinical Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, for help on a research project she is working on in the area of health screening (a/k/a pre-participation physical evaluations) and its importance to athletes. Please help Gloria and her team by taking this 1-minute survey to help them learn more about this issue.

CPR Training for Parents: Why It's Important and What You Should Know

Nearly 350,000 people suffer cardiac arrest annually.   Because cardiac arrest leads to the death of one youth athlete every three days in the United States, sports parents should know how to perform CPR and use an AED, which can significantly increase a victim's chances of survival.

Youth Sports Heroes of the Month: Dan and Susan Farren (Rohnert Park, CA.); Ray Antonopoulos & Jeff Meisner (West Newbury, MA)



In a Cal Ripkin Baseball game on April 13, eight-year-old Matthew Henry was hit in the chest by a pitch and left the batter's box on his way to first base. He collapsed after a few steps, reportedly the victim of commotio cordis ("agitation of the heart," in Latin).

The value of having trained medical personnel and an automated external defibrillator nearby was never more apparent then in this month's Youth Sports Heroes blog honoring two pairs of Good Samaritans who, in an 11-day span, saved the lives of an 8-year-old baseball player and a mom watching her son play baseball.

Safety Comes First, No Matter Sport or Season

The winter sports season is in full swing, and spring sports are a ways off, but safety comes first, no matter what the sport or the season. Here's a sixteen-point safety checklist to keep athletes in the game.

Many U.S. High Schools Unprepared For Cardiac Emergency

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of sudden death in exercising young athletes, but despite data showing that early defibrillation with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can save nearly two-thirds of student-athletes who suffer SCA, many U.S. high schools are not prepared to respond to an SCA or have significant deficiencies that could be improved, a new study finds.
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