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Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Impact Sensors: Frequently Asked Questions

The last several years have seen a growing number of companies introduce to the consumer market the first generation of impact sensors intended for real time monitoring of impacts to the heads of athletes in actual games and practices. Here are our answers to the most frequently asked questions about sensors.

Impact Sensors: Many Benefits Of Real-Time Monitoring

The best way to combat under-reporting and increase the chances a concussion will be identified early on the sports sideline may be through real-time monitoring of head impact exposure to identify high-risk impacts and alert medical personnel on the sideline to the possible need to perform a concussion assessment.

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Concussion Hit Count And Impact Sensor Product Guide

The day when monitoring of head impact exposure in football and other contact and collision sports becomes commonplace is closer at hand than one might think. An increasing number of helmet sensor products in this rapidly evolving field are already on, or about to come to, the market. The following lists some of the currently - or soon-to-be - available head impact sensor systems.

After Concussion: Physical and Mental Rest Keys to Recovery

After a sports concussion physical and mental (e.g. cognitive) rest are keys to recovery, says Dr. William P. Meehan, which means no video games, homework, or other activities that tax the brain and force it to work extra hard.

Factors in Return To Play Decision After Concussion

When it is safe for a youth or high school athlete to return to play contact or collision sports after symptoms of concussion clear depends on many factors, says Dr. William Meehan, including the athlete's age, baseline test data, time symptoms take to clear and severity, and concussion history.

Concussion Safety Laws in Place In Every State

Forty-eight states have enacted a so-called Zackery Lystedt concussion safety law since May 2009.  Wyoming has enacted a weak concussion safety law, and the high school athletic association in Arkansas has rules that mirror the concussion laws of other states..

No Same Day Return To Play After Concussion

The most recent international consensus of concussion experts is that a young athlete with diagnosed concussion should not be allowed to return to play on the day of injury, regardless of the medical resources available and regardless of the level of athletic performance.

Concussion Evaluation and Management Involves Many Factors

The current international consensus statement on concussion in sport lists a range of factors that may influence the evaluation and management of concussion, in some cases predicting the potential for a prolonged recovery, but other guidelines, and some studies, list different risk factors.

High School and Pop Warner Football: Preventing Concussion, Serious Injury Or Death

Preventing serious injury (concussion, traumatic brain injury, spinal paralysis) or death in high school and Pop Warner football; advice from the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Researc on football safety
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