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Christie Rampone: Nutrition and Hydration Advice For Aspiring Athletes

MomsTEAM has designated October as Sports Nutrition Month, and invited some old friends and some new ones to share their wisdom about nutrition by responding to a series of questions. We hope their answers will offer the always on-the-go sports parents we know you are some fresh ideas and choices for healthy, easy-to-make breakfasts, lunches, dinners and between-meal snacks for your active children.

Christie Rampone with gold medals Today we hear from three-time Olympic gold medalist, Captain of the US Women's Soccer Team, and mother of two, Christie Rampone:

MomsTEAM: What kind of healthy snack favorites do you share with your kids?

Taking in the right kind of fuel before a busy day, practice or game, staying properly hydrated, and recovering properly after sports are key says three-time Olympic gold medalist and mother of two, Christie Rampone.

Parents ...Your Support is Needed NOW

I know I speak for your kids when I say "THANK YOU" for everything that you do for them.


These young athletes could never do what they do without the help of their parents and/or guardians.

"THANK YOU" and I know they appreciate it even if they don't say so.

It is that time of year and your son or daughter will be back in school and competing athletically in their sport of choice.

I know I speak for your kids when I say "THANK YOU" for everything that you do for them. No way they could get through all of this without your support, especially as they move on to High School sports.

High School Girls Soccer

College Recruiting: How An Expert Can Help

If you son or daughter wants to play college sports, it is important that you and your student athlete understand the recruiting process and that you are doing what is necessary and and off the field to get noticed. An expert in the college recruiting process can help.

A couple of tips:

If you son or daughter wants to play college sports, it is important that you and your student athlete understand the recruiting process and that you are doing what is necessary and and off the field to get noticed. An expert in the college recruiting process can help.

Aurelio Kamosso (Soccer Coach and Entrepreneur): Helping Soccer Players Find Success One Touch At A Time

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. At MomsTEAM we think sports dads deserve to be honored, not just on the third Sunday in June, but for an entire month. So we have designated June as National Sports Dads Month and invited some veteran sports dads to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions (the same ones we asked sports moms in May).

So far this month we have heard from a fascinating array of fathers, from a former Major League Baseball general manager, to a Minnesota hockey coach and safety advocate, from a sociologist with an expertise in gender and sports to a pediatric sports medicine doctor.

A longtime youth soccer coach talks about developing a soccer training shoe that helps young players find success one "touch" at a time.

Playing for the Right Team: Less Important Than Committment to Sport and Love Of Game

Does playing for the right team, club or high school guarantee getting recruited for college is a question all parents of elite athletes end up facing sometime along the way as their children continue their growth as athletes.

The answer is simply no.  An athlete definitely has to play the sport they love with a commitment to being the best they can be. This can be accomplished at all levels of clubs, but the important thing is that the athlete be competitive with other top players. There is no need to jump from club to club.

Playing for the right team, club or high school doesn't guarantee getting recruited for college. It is more important that an athlete enjoy the team and loves to practice and play.

Limiting Hits To Head In Youth Sports Aim of Innovative "Hit Count" Program

The Sports Legacy Institute's  "Hit Count" initiative is designed to dramatically reduce youth athletes' exposure to repetitive brain trauma in multiple sports, with the goal to reduce concussions, sub-concussive trauma and risk of developing Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Become a Professional Footballer: 6 Footy Secrets for Aspiring Young Players: Pt. 2

Becoming a professional footballer is a very difficult goal, and young players ought to be realistic, while relentless, in their pursuit of this worthwhile dream.

It is a harsh reality that only a small percentage of aspiring players make it to the signing of a professional contract. Young players should understand this, and pursue a solid educational background in order to prepare for the likelihood of life outside of the beautiful game called football.

However, if you’re determined and willing, then you have a better chance of achieving your football dreams than most. In part two of this article series, we’ll cover three more tips for young aspiring players.

Concussions in High School Sports Rising at 15% Annual Rate, Study Finds

Concussion in high school sports are increasing at a 15% annual rate, finds a new study. Consistent with previous studies, football accounted for more than half of all concussions and a concussion rate nearly double the rate for girls' soccer, the sport with the next highest rate. Concussion rates increased across all 12 sports studied.  Although the degree of change varied, ranging from an average annual increase of 8% for football to 27% for wrestling, Girls had a higher rate of concussion that that of boys in those sports (soccer, basketball, baseball/softball) where the boys' and girls' games are essentially the same.

Injury Rate in Youth Soccer Higher Than Other Contact Sports, Study Finds

Soccer has a higher injury rate than many contact/collision sports such as field hockey, rugby, basketball, and football, with players younger than age 15 at higher relative injury risk compared with older players, concludes a clinical report in the journal Pediatrics.

 

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Return to Play After ACL Surgery: How Parents Can Help

The period between the end of physical therapy and the start of sports-specific conditioning is a critical time frame for young athletes after an an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear or rupture, reconstructive surgery, and months of rehabilitation.
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