News & Studies

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Repetitive Head Impacts: A Major Concern At All Levels of Sports

Brain trauma among football players may be less the result of violent helmet-on-helmet collisions that cause concussions as the accumulation of sub-concussive blows.  The long-term effects of such repetitive brain trauma are still unknown.

Concussion Safety Laws in Place In Every State

Forty-nine states have enacted a so-called Zackery Lystedt concussion safety law since May 2009.  Wyoming has enacted a weak concussion safety law, and the high school athletic association in Arkansas has rules that mirror the concussion laws of other states..

MomsTEAM Institute's Screening Of Sony Pictures' Concussion Movie Ends Year On High Note, But More Work To Be Done

On December 21, 2015, MomsTeam Institute of Youth Sports Safety held a special advance screening of Sony Pictures's new movie, Concussion, starring Will Smith, at the Loews - Boston Common theatre. The screening capped off an incredible fifteen months for the Institute.

Helmetless Tackling and Blocking Drills Lead to Decreased Head Impacts in College Football Players

Engaging in a 5-minute helmetless tackling drill twice a week during pre-season football and once a week during the season reduced by almost a third the frequency of impacts to the head over the course of a single season, reports a groundbreaking new study.

U.S. Soccer Bans Soccer Heading At Age 10 And Below, Practice Limits for 11- to 13-year-olds

In a stunning development in the debate over soccer heading, the United States Soccer Federation ("USSF") is now recommending that players age 11 and younger be barred from heading the ball and that headers be limited - but in practice only - for those from age 12 and 13.

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Study Finds Gap Persists in Awareness of Concussion Symptoms, Return-to-Play Practices Following Youth Sports Head Hits

Coaches and parents need more training on concussions to avoid making bad calls about when to let a young athlete back in the game,

Study Shows Rule Limiting Tackling During High School Football Practices Significantly Reduces Concussion Rates

Limiting the amount of full-contact tackling during high school football practices can have a big impact on reducing the number of concussions among players, new research finds.
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