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FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™: Perfect Time For Soccer Safety Tips

As US Women's National Team continues in group play at the FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015, athletic trainer Ralph Reiff, ATC, MEd, director of St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis and former manager of athlete care for the 1996 Olympic Games, offers some important tips for soccer parents to help their kids safe and injury-free.

Injury Rate in Youth Soccer Higher Than Other Contact Sports, Study Finds

Soccer has a higher injury rate than many contact/collision sports such as field hockey, rugby, basketball, and football, with players younger than age 15 at higher relative injury risk compared with older players, concludes a clinical report in the journal Pediatrics.



Concussion Rates in High School Sports Vary By Sport and Gender

Concussion rates in thirteen high school sports from 1998 to 2008, as reported in three separate studies, vary widely by sport and, in some cases, by gender.

FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™: A Reminder That Youth Soccer Injuries Are Preventable

As the best  soccer players in the world compete in the 2010 FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015™, it is important to remember that they would not be playing if an overuse or traumatic injury, such as a torn ACL,  had put the brakes on their careers.  The STOP Sports Injuries Campaign and MomsTeam remind parents that many youth soccer injuries are preventable. 

High School Soccer Severe Injury Rates

The risk of severe injury in high school soccer is less than half that in football, a new study finds.

High School Football, Girls Basketball Have Most Severe Injuries: Study

Which high school sports pose the highest risk of severe injury?  Football leads the list, slightly more than wrestling and more than twice the rate in girls' basketball and girls' soccer.  The safest of the nine studied? Girls volleyball.

Concussion Return to Play Guidelines: Longer Recovery Time Needed, Says Doctor

If it was up to Dr. Lester Mayers, young athletes who suffer sports concussions would be not be allowed to return to play (RTP) for 4 to 6 weeks after injury, a significant departure from current concussion guidelines which allow RTP 1 to 2 weeks after an athlete's concussion signs and symptoms clear, both at rest and during exercise.

Soccer Shin Guards: Safety Seal Will Be Required

A year after requiring soccer shinguards to meet National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) standards, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Soccer Rules Committee will now require the front of the shinguard to be permanently marked with the NOCSAE seal and height range, effective in fall 2012.

MRSA: Risk Factors For Athletes

While skin infections, including MRSA, are reported most often in sports with frequent physical contact, skin contact or activities that may lead to the spread of MRSA skin infections may take place before or after participation in a sport with little physical contact.  Therefore, anyone participating in organized or recreational sports should be aware of the signs of possible skin infections and follow prevention measures.

Concussion Defined

A concussion Is defined as trauma (e.g. usually but not always a blow to the head, face or neck) which causes the brain  to collide with the skull. A "concussion" is derived from the Latin concutere, meaning to shake violently. It is also often referred to as an MTBI (mild traumatic brain injury).
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