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Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Atlanta Medical Group Proposes Sport-Specific Return-to-Play Guidelines

Four years after the American Academy of Pediatrics adopted the recommended return-to-play (RTP) guidelines proposed by the Third International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHA) has proposed sport-specific guidelines for ten sports known to put young athletes at the highest risk for concussion.

Three Common Youth Soccer Injuries: Treatment and Prevention

With the World Cup starting, the author of a new book discusses three soccer-specific conditions that youth soccer players can suffer, all of which can be easily managed with proper care and treatment: Sever's Disease, Osgood-Schlatter's, and Pattellofemoral Syndrome,

Injured Soccer Goalies Must Leave Field, Be Replaced, Says New NFHS Rule

Goalkeepers must now leave the field when they suffer an apparent injury and the referee stops the clock, according to a new rule approved by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Soccer Rules Committee and subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors.

Concussion Rate For Female Middle-School-Aged Soccer Players 4 Times Higher Than For High School Athletes

Female middle school soccer players sustained concussions at a rate higher than their high school and college counterparts, most continued to play despite experiencing symptoms, and less than half sought medical attention, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Heading in Soccer Doesn't Lead To Long-Term Cognitive Decline, Study Finds

Preliminary data from a study of retired professional English soccer players has found that, once their playing careers end, the chronic low-level head trauma they sustained from repetitive heading does not put them at greater risk of long-term cognitive decline than the general population.

Coaches Can Play Important Role in Encouraging Athletes To Report Concussion Symptoms, Studies Find

A growing number of studies challenge the conventional wisdom that inadequate athlete concussion knowledge is the principal barrier to increased concussion symptom reporting.  Because educating youth about the dangers of concussion is unlikely to improve concussion reporting, they say other ways need to be found to increase reporting, among them being to enlist coaches to help create an environment where athletes feel safe in reporting.

Underreporting of Concussion By High School Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education

As many as four out of ten of possible concussions sustained by high school athletes are never reported to a coach or medical professional, with less than one in seven  'bell-ringers' being reported, finds an important new study.

Sports-Related Facial Fractures: Relatively Common But Preventable

Nearly half of sports-related facial fractures among children occur in baseball and softball, says a new study in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, many of which could be prevented if players wore face shields while fielding.

Stronger Necks May Reduce Brain Trauma From Soccer Heading, Study Says

Balanced neck strength may reduce the acceleration of the head during the act of heading a soccer ball, thus reducing the risk of brain injury from such low grade hits, says a 2013 study. The study adds to a growing body of evidence that strengthening neck muscles may be a way to reduce head injury risk from concussion and repetitive sub-concussive trauma.
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