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"Stepwise" Return to Play Recommended For Athletes Sidelined By Concussion For Several Weeks Or Longer

If an athlete has been sidelined by a concussion for several weeks or longer, Dr. Robert Cantu recommends that he follow a "stepwise" approach to return to play.

Advice for Parents When Child's Concussion Symptoms Persist Or Get Worse

Dr. Robert Cantu recommends parents seek additional testing and evaluation if their child's post-concussion signs and symptoms do not clear within a week to 10 days or increase in number or severity.

No Return to Play If Still Have Concussion Symptoms

Sports concussion expert Dr. Cantu says that no athlete should be allowed to return to play sports after a concussion if still experiencing symptoms.

Recognizing Concussion Signs and Symptoms: Advice for Parents

Dr. Robert Cantu says it is extremely important that parents and athletes recognize the signs and symptoms of a concussion.  Not only do athletes need to self-report symptoms, says Dr. Cantu, but they should let the coaching and medical staff know if a teammate is experiencing symptoms.  It just might save his life.

Concussions: Monitor Child in First 24-48 Hours

Regular post-concussion monitoring is essential in the first 24 to 48 hours after injury to check for signs of deteriorating mental status that may indicate a more serious injury, says Dr. Robert Cantu.

Soccer Helmet May Reduce Concussion Risk

Jeff Skeen of Full90 Sports talks about and the role of protective headgear in reducing the risk of concussion and the difference between concussions, which occur as a result of contact between a player's head and a hard object (another player's head, the ground or the goalpost), and the kinds of brain injuries which can occur as a result of repeated heading of a soccer ball.

Soccer Goal Posts Can and Do Fatally Injure Kids

At the beginning of the month, 8-year-old Gabriel Mendoza was hanging on the crossbar of a soccer goal post during a soccer game in South Mountain, Arizona, when it fell on him. He was the ninth boy in the past three years to die from a falling goal post. News reports of his death did not say whether the goal post was anchored or, if it was anchored, whether it was anchored incorrectly.

Anchoring Soccer Goals For Safety is Foundation's Goal

Soccer players across the country will be safer thanks to a national public awareness initiative focusing on safe soccer goals called Anchored for Safety started by the family of Zachary Tran, a six-year-old who was killed when an unanchored goal fell on him in 2003, who created the initiative to prevent tragedies like Zachary's from happening again. "If only we had known the dangers of unsafe goals, we would have been vigilant in keeping our kids away from them. We didn't know," stated Michelle Tran, Zachary's mother and initiative co-founder.

Youth Soccer Injury Prevention Tips

Many of the more than 477,500 youth soccer injuries serious enough to require treatment in hospitals, doctors' offices, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers and
hospital emergency rooms are preventable. Here are some prevention tips.

Heading Soccer Ball Doesn't Cause Brain Damage: Study

Purposeful "heading" of a soccer ball does not appear to result in either short- or long-term brain damages, says two studies, one from 2010 and another from 2012, but experts still think reducing the risk of potential injury from heading the soccer ball is a good idea.

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