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Stronger Necks May Reduce Brain Trauma From Soccer Heading, Study Says

Balanced neck strength may reduce the acceleration of the head during the act of heading a soccer ball, thus reducing the risk of brain injury from such low grade hits, says a 2013 study. The study adds to a growing body of evidence that strengthening neck muscles may be a way to reduce head injury risk from concussion and repetitive sub-concussive trauma.

Double Digit Decline In Youth Sports Injuries Over Last Decade, New Study Finds

There is good news and bad news on the youth sports injury front. The good news is that sports and recreation musculoskeletal injuries declined 12.4 percent in the U.S. over the past 10 years for children ages 5 to 14 years. The bad news: injuries in football and soccer went up, says a new study.

Concussion Education For High School Soccer Players Lacking, Survey Finds

A survey of high school athletic directors, coaches, and certified athletic trainers in Michigan finds that, while concussion education is very common in football, less than half of girls' soccer players received such education.

Girls May Be No Worse Off After Sports Concussions Than Boys, Study Finds

Girls don't appear to be worse off after sports-related concussion than boys, either in terms of concussion symptoms or on neurocognitive tests measuring reaction time and visual memory, a new study finds.

Neuromuscular Training Program in Mid-Teens Most Effective In Reducing Female ACL Injury Risk, Study Finds

Pre- or early adolescence appears to be the best time to start a neuromuscular training program in order to reduce the number of injuries female athletes suffer to their anterior cruciate ligaments, says a new study.

Balance Training Can Help Reduce Soccer Injury Risk And Improve Skills

From ball-handling skills to landing softly on one leg as a way of reducing the risk of an ACL tear, balance training is something every young soccer player should include in their workout programs.

Parents Rethinking Contact Sports

Local youth football organizers in Minnesota say they are experiencing a 20 percent decline in registrations this year, citing increased awareness of the potential of serious injury and parents who are apparently picking other sports for their 3rd and 4th grade children.

Heading in Soccer: Long-Term Effect Remains Unclear

While it is possible that intentional heading in soccer represents a form of repetitive subconcussive mild brain injury which, over time,  could be a cause of chronic traumatic encephalpathy (CTE), the possible cause-and-effect relationship remains theoretical, says a 2012 study.

Women's World Cup Perfect Time For Soccer Safety Tips

As USA Women's World Cup soccer team prepares to meet Japan in the gold medal game, athletic trainer Ralph Reiff, ATC, MEd, director of St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis and former manager of athlete care for the 1996 Olympic Games, 
offers some important tips for soccer parents to help their kids safe and injury-free.

Injury Rate in Youth Soccer Higher Than Other Contact Sports, Study Finds

Soccer has a higher injury rate than many contact/collision sports such as field hockey, rugby, basketball, and football, with players younger than age 15 at higher relative injury risk compared with older players, concludes a clinical report in the journal Pediatrics.

 

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