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Why Tougher Rules for Dangerous Hits in High School Hockey Will Not Work


As I watch the Stanley Cup playoffs I am reminded each spring about the ever-changing rules in hockey: One set for the regular season, and one set for playoffs. Or should I say one rule book and two or more interpretations of the enforcement of the rules in the book. Clearly there is much more leeway from the rule book during the playoffs. Players tripped on breakaways do not draw a penalty. Obvious rule violations are ignored. But lets be clear about the NHL: the league is an entertainment business that happens to play hockey. Fans like the brutality and violence. It sells tickets so it is allowed to happen. 

Tougher rules against checking from behind and blind-side hits in hockey won't make the sport safer. The problem is a lack of training, certification, education and compensation for on-ice officials, argues one longtime Minnesota hockey official and coach.

Giving Back as a Family

The sport of soccer has given our family so much over the years. When I actually look back at the 35 years I have been married soccer has always been part of our daily lives.

From my college education, to my career as a professional player, to my current career directing Twellman Soccer, this sport has always been part of my life.

The same is true for my three kids. From their education to their careers to their love of the game soccer has always
and continues to be part of their lives.

The love of the sport has and will always be present but now our focus has changed.

Are we listening to the injured athlete?

No Gender Differences In Concussion Severity Or Outcomes Found in High School Sports

High school girls who suffer concussions in sports do not report a greater number of symptoms, take longer for their symptoms to clear, or return to play later than males, says a surprising new study.  But while the severity and outcome of concussions, as measured in the time symptoms take to clear and for athletes to return to play, do not vary by gender, the type of symptoms reported by girls are more subtle and easily missed than those boys report, say the new authors of the study published in the Journal of Athletic Training.

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