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Concussion Treatment & Recovery

After Concussion: Physical and Mental Rest Keys to Recovery

After a sports concussion physical and mental (e.g. cognitive) rest are keys to recovery, says Dr. William P. Meehan, which means no video games, homework, or other activities that tax the brain and force it to work extra hard.

Concussion Evaluation and Management Involves Many Factors

The current international consensus statement on concussion in sport lists a range of factors that may influence the evaluation and management of concussion, in some cases predicting the potential for a prolonged recovery, but other guidelines, and some studies, list different risk factors.

Concussion Checklist for Parents

MomsTeam Founder and long-time concussion safety advocate, Brooke de Lench, provides a concussion safety checklist for parents to know their child's sports program is taking concussions seriously.

Concussions: Parents Are Critical Participants in Recognition, Treatment, Recovery

Parents are critical participants in the recognition and treatment of, and recovery from, a concussion, not only in the first 24 to 48 hours but during every step in the process towards an eventual return to the play.

Sports Concussion Myths and Misconceptions

Sports concussion myths are still common, despite increased media focus and education in recent years.

Gradual Return to Play After Concussions Recommended

Athletes who suffer concussion should follow a six-step, symptom-limited, return to play process towards return to game play and may require a longer rest period and/or extended period of non-contact exercise before return than adults because they have a different physiological response to concussion, take longer to recover, and have other unique risk factors.

More Conservative Approach to Concussions in Children, Teens Recommended

Because the brain of the young athlete is still developing, with even subtle damage leading to learning deficits adversely affecting development, and with studies showing younger athletes recover more slowly than adults, a more conservative approach to concussions in children and teens than for older athletes is recommended.

Study Confirms Adverse Effect of Concussion On Academic Learning And Performance of Children and Teens

Student-athletes who experience lingering concussion symptoms and their parents are more concerned about the adverse effect of concussion on learning and school performance, report more school-related problems, and more classes posing difficulty than students who recover more quickly, finds a new study.

Dizziness After Sport-Related Concussion: Could Vestibular And Physical Therapy Be Missing Treatment Option?

While physical and cognitive rest during the period immediately after concussion is widely considered the cornerstone of concussion management, it might hinder recovery in those patients whose dizziness is the result of an injury to the cervical spine, who might benefit more from early, aggressive and active treatment for their dizziness.

SmartTeams™ Talks: MSU's Covassin Discusses Gender Differences In Concussion Risk and Outcomes

In a fact-filled and informative SmartTeams Talk™, a leading expert on gender and concussions reviews the research finding differences in concussion risk and outcomes between female and male athletes, and how MomsTEAM's SmartTeams™ program is designed to increase concussion reporting through education.
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