Overuse Injuries

Back in Action, If Not In The Game: A Halftime Report On A Teenager's Recovery From A Stress Fracture Of His Spine

First, a thank you

In my last blog I wrote about my son's back injury and the start of physical therapy, but before I report on his progress, I want to extend a special thank you to everyone who contacted me after reading my blog post. My intuition told me that the fractured spine he suffered is an injury that has affected many other youth athletes and families. I was completely overwhelmed by the number of people who called, emailed, IM'd, commented on the blog site, or ran me down (figuratively, at least) in the grocery store to ask about my son. Thank you all so much.

After suffering a stress fracture of his lumbar spine, a 13-year-old Texas football player begins rehabbing his injury with rigorous physical therapy. His mom provides a halftime report from the sideline.

Michael Goldenberg: Year-Round Play And Pressure To Play In Pain Lead To Overuse Injuries

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam is again asking our friends in the medical, health, fitness, nutrition and athletic training communities to write blogs answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.  Michael Goldenberg Athletic Director Lawrenceville School

Today, we hear from Michael Goldenberg, Athletic Director of and Athletic Trainer at the Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, New Jersey.

By Michael S. Goldenberg, MS, ATC 

A longtime athletic trainer at one of the nation's leading prep schools attributes the epidemic of overuse injuries in high school sports to early specialization, the intense pressure kids are under in today's youth sports to continue playing in pain, and the lack of proper medical care at the pre-high school level.

Deb Bowen: "Aha" Moment After Son's Injury Inspired Career Teaching Yoga To Teen Athletes

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam is again asking our friends in the health, fitness, nutrition and athletic training communities to write blogs answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from certified yoga instructor, Deb Bowen. 

A sports mom tells how she was inspired by her son's overuse injury to become a certified yoga teacher so she could bring the physical and mental benefits of yoga to teen athletes.

Serious Overuse Injuries Linked To Athlete's Socioeconomic Status

Are athletes whose families can afford the high cost of today's increasingly specialized and expensive youth sports paying a price in higher rates of injury? The answer appears to be yes, according to new research for the first time links overuse injury rates in young athletes with their socioeconomic status.

Overuse Injuries and Burnout in Youth Sports: What We Know And What We Don't

While much is known about the causes and risk factors associated with overuse injuries and burnout, more research is needed, concludes a new position statement on overuse injuries and burnout.

Female Athletes: Eat Right, Train Smarter, and Get Enough Rest, Advises Cards' Doctor

If you are parenting a female athlete, you may have a tough time convincing her to take your advice, even if you enjoyed a successful sports career yourself. Perhaps she will listen to an orthopedic surgeon for a major league baseball team who, before she became a doctor, was a triple jump champion and record-holder in high school track in Iowa.

Safety Comes First, No Matter Sport or Season

The winter sports season is in full swing, and spring sports are a ways off, but safety comes first, no matter what the sport or the season. Here's a sixteen-point safety checklist to keep athletes in the game.

New Jersey Athletic Trainers To Hold Third Annual Sports Safety Summit

MomsTEAM has consistently supported athletic trainers' groups, both at the national (NATA) and state level, in their efforts to improve youth sports safety, both through education and by advocating for ATs in every high school (less than half of U.S. high schools have an AT on staff, although the percentages vary dramatically from state to state).

One of the most active athletic trainers' association at the state level is in New Jersey, which was the first state to require by law that coaches receive safety training, is among the 40 states that have enacted strong youth concussion safety laws, and has been a leader in advocating for academic accommodations for concussed student-athletes. 

Athletic trainers are essential to making youth sports as safe as it can be.  Educational programs, such as the Athletic Trainers Society of New Jersey's third annual sports safety summit on August 1, 2012 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, are important to educating health care professionals on safety issues, including concussions, heat illness, sudden cardiac death and overuse injuries.

Is Your Child's Coach Committing an Athletic Felony?

Much has been written lately about the emotional damage coaches can do to youth athletes.

Coaches who selfishly overuse and physically push athletes too far for the benefit of the team's win-loss record or their own ego are committing an athletic felony.

Preventing Overuse Injuries, Overtraining, and Burnout: 9 Ways Parents Can Help

Overuse injuries and burnout continue to be a major problem in youth sports.  Multiple injuries among some young athletes highlight the need for rest to prevent overuse injuries, overtraining, and burnout in young athletes. Here are 9 ways experts say parents can help.
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