Knee (e.g. ACL)

Deb Bowen: "Aha" Moment After Son's Injury Inspired Career Teaching Yoga To Teen Athletes

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam is again asking our friends in the health, fitness, nutrition and athletic training communities to write blogs answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from certified yoga instructor, Deb Bowen. 

A sports mom tells how she was inspired by her son's overuse injury to become a certified yoga teacher so she could bring the physical and mental benefits of yoga to teen athletes.

Five Commonly Used Sports Medicine Tests and Procedures Parents Should Question

The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) has released a list of five tests and procedures that are commonly ordered but not always necessary in sports medicine, to facilitate conversations between patients and physicians about what care is really necessary.

Recovery From ACL Surgery Complete, Student-Athlete Starts Website To Support Others

After her successful recovery from a torn ACL, one Texas high school soccer player decided that other athletes shouldn't have to deal with the same emotional pain she felt while going through my injury, so she started a website to provide emotional support, information and advice to other athletes trying to bounce back from similar sports-related injuries.

ACL Reconstruction Surgery Puts At Greater Risk Of Osteoarthritis Later in Life, Say Researchers

Teens who have ACL reconstruction are more likely to demonstrate osteoarthritic changes later in life, say researchers presenting to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in New Orleans on March 15, 2014.

Insurance Coverage, Household Income Affect Timing Of ACL Surgery In Children and Teens, Researchers Say

Whether a child or teen has early ACL reconstructive surgery that experts recommend is more a function of their parent's insurance coverage and household income than strictly medical considerations, say researchers in a paper presented at American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) 2014 Specialty Day in New Orleans.

Early ACL Reconstruction Strongly Recommended For Young Athletes, Study Says

Children and adolescents who undergo early surgical reconstruction after suffering a complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) have much better outcomes than those who delay surgery or never have surgery at all, says a new study. Early ACL reconstruction is strongly recommended, particularly for active young athletes who wish to maintain higher levels of physical activity.

ACL Injuries in High School Sports: No Gender Difference Found

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries do not disproportionately affect female athletes, occur more often from player-to-player contact, and far more frequently in competition than practice than previously believed, finds a surprising and important new study.

Knee Pain in Young Athletes Could Be Patellofemoral Syndrome

The most important way to reduce the short- and long-term affects of poorly positioned kneecaps (patellofemoral dysfunction) is early intervention: physical therapy to strengthen the quad, teach stretching exercises, and guide appropriate biomechanics. Allowing knee pain to persist only decreases the potential for return to pain free sport.

Neuromuscular Training Program in Mid-Teens Most Effective In Reducing Female ACL Injury Risk, Study Finds

Pre- or early adolescence appears to be the best time to start a neuromuscular training program in order to reduce the number of injuries female athletes suffer to their anterior cruciate ligaments, says a new study.

Most Soccer Players Return to Play After ACL Reconstructive Surgery, Study Finds

Most soccer players are able to return to play after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery (ACLR), but one in eight who return end up having additional surgery, with females and those whose first surgery was on their non-dominant leg most at risk, a new study finds.
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