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Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

SmartTeams™ Talk: Make Sure Neuropsychologist Has Training In Concussion Testing and Treatment, Says Pieroth

Make sure that the neuropsychologist involved in your child's treatment after concussion has training in concussion assessment and treatment, has kept up with evolving research and practice guidelines, and understands athletes and sports culture, says neuropsychologist Elizabeth M. Pieroth, Psy.D, Associate Director of the Sports Concussion Program of NorthShore Medical Group and consultant to the Chicago Bears and Cubs.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Individualized Return To Learn Approach Needed, Says Pieroth

Return to learn is just as important as return to play, says a top neuropsychologist and it is important to assess a child's individual symptoms and what triggers them to determine what adjustments to the school day are appropriate.

SmartTeams™ Talk: Don’t Overprescribe Cognitive Rest After Concussion, Says Pieroth

Emerging science and expert consensus are challenging the notion that an extended period of complete cognitive and physical rest after concussion is necessary for recovery, and that concussed athletes need no more than 1-2 days rest at home, after which they should return to school with modifications to the school day as needed.

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Study Finds Gap Persists in Awareness of Concussion Symptoms, Return-to-Play Practices Following Youth Sports Head Hits

Coaches and parents need more training on concussions to avoid making bad calls about when to let a young athlete back in the game,

Study Shows Rule Limiting Tackling During High School Football Practices Significantly Reduces Concussion Rates

Limiting the amount of full-contact tackling during high school football practices can have a big impact on reducing the number of concussions among players, new research finds.

Coaches and Parents: If Concussion Suspected, What To Do Next Is Simple

If a parent, coach, or game official suspects that a player has suffered a concussion playing sports, the player should be removed immediately from play, banned from returning that day, and be sent to be checked out right away by a medical professional. No sideline test, smartphone app or screening tool can help decide whether to allow the athlete to continue playing.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Purdue Study First To Find Subtle Cognitive Deficits In High School Football Players From Repetitive Head Impacts

A 2010 study by researchers at Purdue University was the first to report that football players who displayed no clinically-observable signs of concussion, nevertheless showed measurable impairment of neurocognitive function (primarily visual working memory) on neurocognitive tests, as well as altered activation in neurophysiologic function on sophisticated brain imaging tests (fMRI).
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