Home » Health & Safety Channel » Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Youth Ice Hockey Safety Tips

Each year, almost 87,000 hockey-related injuries to youths under age 15 are treated in hospitals, doctors' offices, clinics, ambulatory surgery centers and hospital emergency rooms. The total cost of these hockey-related injuries was more than $978 million in 2006. This amount includes medical, legal and liability, work loss, and pain and suffering costs.

Concussion Checklist for Parents

MomsTeam Founder and long-time concussion safety advocate, Brooke de Lench, provides a concussion safety checklist for parents to know their child's sports program is taking concussions seriously.

Concussion Signs and Symptoms

Concussion signs (observable by others) and symptoms (experienced by the athlete) fall into five clusters: symptoms, physical signs, behavioral changes, cognitive impairments, and sleep difficulties. Symptom scales continue to be a critical component in concussion assessment.

 

Concussions: Parents Are Critical Participants in Recognition, Treatment, Recovery

Parents are critical participants in the recognition and treatment of, and recovery from, a concussion, not only in the first 24 to 48 hours but during every step in the process towards an eventual return to the play.

Sports Concussion Myths and Misconceptions

Sports concussion myths are still common, despite increased media focus and education in recent years.

Gradual Return to Play After Concussions Recommended

Athletes who suffer concussion should follow a six-step, symptom-limited, return to play process towards return to game play and may require a longer rest period and/or extended period of non-contact exercise before return than adults because they have a different physiological response to concussion, take longer to recover, and have other unique risk factors.

More Conservative Approach to Concussions in Children, Teens Recommended

Because the brain of the young athlete is still developing, with even subtle damage leading to learning deficits adversely affecting development, and with studies showing younger athletes recover more slowly than adults, a more conservative approach to concussions in children and teens than for older athletes is recommended.

SmartTeams™ Talks: MSU's Covassin Discusses Gender Differences In Concussion Risk and Outcomes

In a fact-filled and informative SmartTeams Talk™, a leading expert on gender and concussions reviews the research finding differences in concussion risk and outcomes between female and male athletes, and how MomsTEAM's SmartTeams™ program is designed to increase concussion reporting through education.

Improving Concussion Safety In Youth Sports: Why I Opt For Grass Roots Activism Over Class Action Lawsuits

Last week was chock full of news on the youth sports safety front.

MomsTEAM continues to believe the best way to make sports safer is not by filing class action lawsuits, spending our time scouring the Internet for media reports of catastrophic injuries to send to personal injury lawyers, but through education and grass-roots activism.

SmartTeams™ Talks: Dr. Rosemarie Moser Says Cognitive Rest After Concussion Is Best Treatment

A practicing sports concussion neuropsychologist and leading concussion researcher, Dr. Rosemarie Moser, talks about why it is so important for student-athletes to get cognitive rest after a concussion, what cognitive rest means, and why she urges athletes to "love their brain, love their sport," which means not returning to sports for around 3 weeks after their concussion symptoms are gone.
Syndicate content