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Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Pediatrics Group Declines To Endorse Outright Ban On Tackle Football

The American Academy of Pediatrics today endorsed efforts to limit contact practices in youth football, but declined to make a clear recommendation in favor of delaying the age at which tackling is introduced, and likewise refused to support those calling for an outright ban on tackling in football for athletes below age 18,

Chronic Under-Reporting of Concussion Symptoms By Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education and Awareness

Chronic under-reporting of concussions among high school football players continues to be a problem, despite increased awareness, education and legislation, says new research.

Study Finds Gap Persists in Awareness of Concussion Symptoms, Return-to-Play Practices Following Youth Sports Head Hits

Coaches and parents need more training on concussions to avoid making bad calls about when to let a young athlete back in the game,

Study Shows Rule Limiting Tackling During High School Football Practices Significantly Reduces Concussion Rates

Limiting the amount of full-contact tackling during high school football practices can have a big impact on reducing the number of concussions among players, new research finds.

Coaches and Parents: If Concussion Suspected, What To Do Next Is Simple

If a parent, coach, or game official suspects that a player has suffered a concussion playing sports, the player should be removed immediately from play, banned from returning that day, and be sent to be checked out right away by a medical professional. No sideline test, smartphone app or screening tool can help decide whether to allow the athlete to continue playing.

Repetitive Head Impacts Damage The Brain: A 'No Brainer,' Purdue Researchers Find

Research by scientists at Purdue goes a long way to eliminating any remaining doubt that repetitive head impacts, such as sustained by players in American football, result in brain abnormalities and impaired neurocognitive functioning during a football season, and that those effects persist long after the season.

Purdue Study First To Find Subtle Cognitive Deficits In High School Football Players From Repetitive Head Impacts

A 2010 study by researchers at Purdue University was the first to report that football players who displayed no clinically-observable signs of concussion, nevertheless showed measurable impairment of neurocognitive function (primarily visual working memory) on neurocognitive tests, as well as altered activation in neurophysiologic function on sophisticated brain imaging tests (fMRI).

Youth and High School Sports Concussion Cases: Do They Show The Limits of Litigation In Making Sports Safer?

In July 2015, a federal court in San Francisco threw out a suit by youth soccer players challenging the way FIFA and a group of U.S.-based soccer organizations deal with head injuries. A state court in Illinois appears poised to do the same in a suit by football players against the Illinois High School Association saying it hasn't done enough to protect them against the risk of concussions. Two attorneys say the cases may show the limits of litigation as a way to improve concussion safety.

Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

Power of the Permit: Improving Youth Sports Safety One Municipality at a Time


If you are involved in a private youth sports program which plays on publicly-owned fields, diamonds, rinks, or courts, or are in local government, you have probably been hearing a lot lately about what is being dubbed the "power of the permit": the authority municipalities and towns around the country are using to condition use of their athletic facilities by private programs on compliance with state concussion safety laws from which they would otherwise be exempt, or, in an increasing number of instances, to fill gaps in their state's law.

A growing number of municipalities are using the power of the permit to require private sports programs to comply with state-mandated concussion safety laws, or impose additional conditions beyond those required by state law, but, as MomsTEAM Institute Executive Director explains, it isn't an isolated or new phenomenon. It's been a growing trend for years.
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