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Sports-Related Concussions & Subconcussive Injuries

Youth and High School Sports Concussion Cases: Do They Show The Limits of Litigation In Making Sports Safer?

In July 2015, a federal court in San Francisco threw out a suit by youth soccer players challenging the way FIFA and a group of U.S.-based soccer organizations deal with head injuries. A state court in Illinois appears poised to do the same in a suit by football players against the Illinois High School Association saying it hasn't done enough to protect them against the risk of concussions. Two attorneys say the cases may show the limits of litigation as a way to improve concussion safety.

Texas Youth Football Program: Ten Ways It Is Walking The Talk On Safety

Participation in youth sports in general, and in youth football in particular, is on the decline in some parts of the nation.  One of the biggest factors driving the decline is a concern about injuries. 

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices?

Lots of youth sports programs say they want to improve safety, but how many are actually making the effort to implement best health and safety practices? I can't speak for every program, but I know one that is definitely walking the talk: the youth tackle and flag football and cheer program in Grand Prairie, Texas, where I spent the first week of August educating and training kids, parents, coaches, and administrators on ways to make football safer as part of MomsTEAM Institute's SmartTeams| UNICEF International Safeguards of Children in Sports project.

Power of the Permit: Improving Youth Sports Safety One Municipality at a Time

 

If you are involved in a private youth sports program which plays on publicly-owned fields, diamonds, rinks, or courts, or are in local government, you have probably been hearing a lot lately about what is being dubbed the "power of the permit": the authority municipalities and towns around the country are using to condition use of their athletic facilities by private programs on compliance with state concussion safety laws from which they would otherwise be exempt, or, in an increasing number of instances, to fill gaps in their state's law.

A growing number of municipalities are using the power of the permit to require private sports programs to comply with state-mandated concussion safety laws, or impose additional conditions beyond those required by state law, but, as MomsTEAM Institute Executive Director explains, it isn't an isolated or new phenomenon. It's been a growing trend for years.

MomsTeam Awarded NCAA-DOD Mind Matters Challenge Educational Grant

On July 15, the NCAA and Department of Defense (DOD) announced the selection of MomsTeam Youth Sports Safety Institute as a recipient of a Mind Matters Challenge grant for our application, Creating a Safe Concussion Reporting Environment: A Multi-Media Approach.

The NCAA and Department of Defense (DOD) have selected MomsTeam Youth Sports Safety Institute as one of six winners of a Mind Matters Challenge grant for our application, Creating a Safe Concussion Reporting Environment: A Multi-Media Approach.

Study Confirms Adverse Effect of Concussion On Academic Learning And Performance of Children and Teens

Student-athletes who experience lingering concussion symptoms and their parents are more concerned about the adverse effect of concussion on learning and school performance, report more school-related problems, and more classes posing difficulty than students who recover more quickly, finds a new study.

Multiple Concussions More Prevalent In Athletes With ADHD and Learning Disabilities

High school and college athletes with a history of developmental disorders such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disability (LD) are 2 to 3 times more likely to self-report having experienced multiple concussions than those without such history, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Controversial Headgear Mandate for Girl's Lacrosse Ignored Science

 

The debate over whether helmets should be mandated in girl's lacrosse, which has been raging for several years, reached a new level of ferocity recently with the publication of a blistering piece in the New York Times reporting on the backlash generated by the controversial decision by the Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) to mandate a soft form of headgear for everyone in a girls' lacrosse game beginning this spring season.

The debate over whether helmets should be mandated in girl's lacrosse reached a new level of ferocity recently with the publication of a blistering piece in the New York Times reporting on the backlash generated by the controversial decision by the Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) to mandate a soft form of headgear for everyone in a girls' lacrosse game beginning this spring season.

Minimize Head Injury Risk By Monitoring Field Hardness

A properly maintained playing surface can help reduce head injury risk. Whether natural or synthetic turf, field management practices directly affect field hardness and, in turn, the risk of head injury. As a result, monitoring field hardness is key.

Dizziness After Sport-Related Concussion: Could Vestibular And Physical Therapy Be Missing Treatment Option?

While physical and cognitive rest during the period immediately after concussion is widely considered the cornerstone of concussion management, it might hinder recovery in those patients whose dizziness is the result of an injury to the cervical spine, who might benefit more from early, aggressive and active treatment for their dizziness.

Chris Borland Retirement Decision: 3 Lessons for Sports Parents (Link to HuffPo Blog)

The decision by San Francisco 49er Chris Borland to retire from the NFL after just one season out of concern for the long-term effect of head trauma has predictably generated a media firestorm. But lost amid the hoopla is what it means for sports parents.

Here are two lessons I think parents with kids playing -- or considering playing -- football or other contact and collision sports can take away from the Borland retirement, and one lesson they shouldn't take away:

The decision by San Francisco 49er Chris Borland to retire from the NFL after just one season out of concern for the long-term effect of head trauma has predictably generated a media firestorm. But lost amid the hoopla are the lessons for sports parents.
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