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Spinal Cord Injuries

"Friday Night Tykes": Episode 3

 

As was the case with the two-hour premiere, the third episode of "Friday Night Tykes" on the Esquire Network continued to be "must see" television for youth football parents for its educational value. Here are some of the safety issues it raised, with links to MomsTEAM content for further reading.

NATA Re-Releases Position Statement on Crown Of Helmet Violations In Football

The National Athletic Trainers' Association has re-released an official statement regarding the calling of crown of the helmet violations in an effort to ensure sports safety at every level of football participation. Re-issuance of the statement by the NATA comes in the wake of at least two deaths of high school football players from catastrophic cervical spine injuries in 2013.

Preventing Head Injuries in Football: No Tackling With Crown Of Helmet!

In the four years I have been sharing my expertise on how to prevent helmet-crown related injuries in football, there has been an increase of concussion awareness here on MomsTeam and all over the country.   But such steps as baseline concussion testing are meaningless if the cause of the initial concussion is not addressed, because the player will suffer a more severe concussion without identifying the cause.

The way to prevent concussions and serious head and spinal injuries in football is for parents to make sure that coaches are trained on how to teach players to avoid tackling with the crown of their helmets.

Athletes Saving Athletes: The Name Says It All

After a certified athletic trainer saved Tommy Mallon's life when he suffered a spinal fracture in his last high school lacrosse game,  his mom Beth started Advocates for Injured Athletes and began a pilot program called Athletes Saving Athletes to train high school athletes about head and neck injuries, sudden cardiac arrest, heat illness, diabetes, and asthma.

Stiffening Penalties For Violent Hits By Minnesota Hockey League Important Step In Improving Player Safety

 

This past weekend, the MInnesota State High School League took an unprecedented step of changing the rules mid-season, by stiffening the penalties on three of the most violent and dangerous infractions in hockey: checking from behind, boarding and contact to the head will now result in an automatic five-minute "major" against the offending player resulting in ejection and forcing his team to play short-handed for five minutes, regardless of how many times it is scored upon during the ensuing power play. 

By stiffening the rules against dangerous play in ice hockey and giving referees less discretion in calling penalties, the Minnesota State High School League has taken an important first step to reduce the number of catastrophic injuries in the sport.

Jabs #13: Making Youth Hockey Safer In Wake of Jablonski Tragedy

While Jablonski's injury was, of course, his parent's worst nightmare, and will change his life forever, such injuries are fortunately quite rare in ice hockey but the publicity, in this instance, has prompted calls for the leaders of youth and high school hockey in Minnesota to demand stricter rule enforcement, better coaching, and more severe penalties for dangerous and illegal "hits" that lead to hockey being a sport with one of the highest rates of concussion.

Longtime Minnesota ice hockey coach Hal Tearse talks about how the catastrophic injury suffered by high school hockey player Jack "Jabs" Jablonski and suggests ways to make the sport safer.

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