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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

Baseline Scores On SCAT2 Concussion Test Vary By Youth Athlete's Gender and Concussion History, Says Study

Scores on a test commonly used to assess concussions on the sport sideline vary by an athlete's gender and concussion history, reports a new study.  Establishing an individual baseline for each youth athlete in contact and collision sports is therefore critical to proper management of a subsequent concussion and the timing for safe return to play.

Study Questions Reliability of Popular Concussion Measurement Tool

A computerized neuropsychological test commonly used to evaluate sports-related concussions misclassified up to 29 percent of healthy participants in a recent test by a University of Texas at Arlington kinesiology researcher.

Baseline Neuropsychological Tests: Getting Valid Results Poses Challenge

Along with studies reporting high concussion rates, increased concussion awareness among athletes, parents, coaches and health care providers, and new state concussion safety laws has come rapid growth in the use of computerized neuropsychological testing in evaluating and managing sports concussions, particularly at the college and high school levels. The problem, says sports concussion neuropsychologist, Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D, is that obtaining a valid baseline test result can be a challenge, especially for youth athletes.

Concussion Risk Doesn't End with School Year

Because summer sports are less likely to be staffed by an athletic trainer or other health care professional with specialized expertise in recognizing and treating concussion, parents need to be especially vigilant to the signs and symptoms of concussion.

Paper and Pencil Neuropsychological Testing for Concussions: Valuable But Come with Limitations

Pencil and paper neuropsychological tests have proven useful for identifying cognitive deficits resulting from concussions, and have been available to sports medicine clinicians for years but have a number of limitations.

Computerized Neurocognitive Testing: Important Role in Concussion Evaluation, Return To Play Decision

Computerized neuropsycognitive testing for concussions has become increasingly popular in recent years and have been shown to have value in making the all-important return to play decision.

King-Devick Test Promises More Rapid, Reliable Sideline Screening for Concussions

A test for disturbed eye movements has the potential to provide rapid and accurate sideline screening for concussion on the sports sideline, says a new study in the journal Neurology. The King-Devick (K-D) test measuring the speed of rapid number naming is an accurate and reliable method for identifying athletes who should be removed from a game or practice for further evaluation, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found.

AAP Recommendations On Sport-Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents

Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on the evaluation and treatment of sport-related concussions in children and adolescents based on the latest consensus of experts.

Honest Self-Reporting Of Concussion Symptoms Critical

Honest self-reporting by athletes of concussion signs and symptoms, both their own and those of their teammates, and not returning to play until all symptoms have cleared both at rest and with exercise is critical for the short- and long-term health of youth and high school athletes.

Concussion Follow-Up

After the initial sideline assessment, an athlete with a suspected concussion should not be left alone, should be monitored for deteriorating mental status over the next few hours, and should be further evaluated in a hospital emergency room or doctor's office.

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