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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

Chronic Under-Reporting Of Concussion: Is Changing The Culture A Realistic Solution?

 

If your child plays a contact or collision sport, whether at be at the youth, middle school or high school level, odds are that at some point in their athletic career they will suffer a concussion. How well they recover depends a lot on how quickly their concussion is identified so they can be removed from practice or game action. 

A lot of student-athletes - a declining percentage, fortunately - don't appreciate precisely when they have suffered a concussion. There are a lot of reasons:

Most athletes won't self-report concussion symptoms to sideline personnel, much less voluntarily remove themselves from the game. Changing the culture is one way to address the problem of chronic under-reporting, but it can't be counted on as a panacea.

Concussion Education For High School Soccer Players Lacking, Survey Finds

A survey of high school athletic directors, coaches, and certified athletic trainers in Michigan finds that, while concussion education is very common in football, less than half of girls' soccer players received such education.

King-Devick: New Screening Tool May Dramatically Improve Concussion Detection Rate on Sports Sideline

A new study provides additional evidence that the King-Devick Test, a simple two-minute test of rapid eye movement, is an accurate "remove-from-play" sideline concussion assessment tool which can accurately identify athletes with concussion, even when they neither display obvious concussion signs nor report any symptoms.

Pediatricians and ER Doctors: More Concussion Training Needed

Although pediatric primary care and emergency medicine ;providers regularly treat concussions, many admit to lacking the training or tools needed to diagnose and manage concussed patients, a new study finds.

Girls May Be No Worse Off After Sports Concussions Than Boys, Study Finds

Girls don't appear to be worse off after sports-related concussion than boys, either in terms of concussion symptoms or on neurocognitive tests measuring reaction time and visual memory, a new study finds.

King-Devick Testing Kits For Chicago Schools: Just One Tool In Concussion Tool Box

Last week's announcement that a foundation named in honor of the late Chicago Bear Dave Duerson had donated a King-Devick test kit to each of Chicago Public School's 80 high school football programs for use in assessing athletes for suspected concussion on the sports sideline, and that the foundation will work with CPS and the K-D Test manufacturer to implement system-wide testing, was welcome news.

So too was that the Dave Duerson Family Foundation, thru individual and corporate sponsors, plans to roll out its program in other cities in the U.S.

The announcement that the Dave Duerson Foundation was donating a King-Devick test kit to all 80 Chicago high school football programs was welcome news, but it isn't a magic bullet in sideline concussion assessment.

Athletes' Resistance To Self-Reporting of Concussion Continues Despite Increased Education

Athletes continue to underreport concussion even when they know the signs and symptoms, finds a new study, suggesting that efforts to break the code of silence which pervades contact sports, and change the attitudes of athletes towards reporting concussion, don't appear to be working.

Concussion Signs and Symptoms: Delayed Onset More Common in Children, Teens

Not every young athlete who suffers a concussion playing sports will exhibit signs and/or symptoms of concussion immediately after injury, so parents always need to be on the lookout for a delayed onset of symptoms, says a top sports concussion expert.

NIH Study Links Childhood CT Scans To Increased Risk Of Leukemia and Brain Cancer

Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan, says a new study reported in the British medical journal, The Lancet.
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