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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

NOCSAE Voiding of Certification For Sensor-Equipped Helmets: A Big Blow To Player Safety

Last week many of the technology manufacturers who have been working diligently to produce products to make helmeted sports such as football safer were dealt a severe, if not crippling, blow by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) when, out of the blue, it decided to view modification of helmets with third-party after-market add-ons as voiding its certification, which could only be regained if the helmet is retested with the add-on. Newcastle Racers wearing three different football helmets

Brooke de Lench believes that the new NOCSAE ruling voiding the certification for sensor-equipped helmets could not have come at a worse time, just as football - from the youth level to the NFL - is gearing up for the 2012 season. If not reversed or modified, de Lench fears that it will have harsh real-world consequences; not just on sensor manufacturers but on player safety and consumer choice.

Underreporting of Concussion By High School Athletes Continues Despite Increased Education

As many as four out of ten of possible concussions sustained by high school athletes are never reported to a coach or medical professional, with less than one in seven  'bell-ringers' being reported, finds an important new study.

Baseline Neurocognitive Concussion Testing: Lack Of Sleep May Skew Results

Athletes who didn't get enough sleep the night before undergoing baseline concussion testing didn't perform as well as expected, say researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's 2013 Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

Trauma-Triggered Migraine or Concussion? Sometimes It's Difficult To Tell

Headaches are the most commonly reported symptom of concussion, but could be the result of a disorder called trauma-triggered migraines (TTMs) and not the result of a concussion, says a new case study and literature review.

King-Devick Test: An Important Part of Sideline Concussion Screening Battery

A new study says that including the King-Devick test, a measure of fast eye movement, along with neurocognitive and balance testing as part of a battery of rapid concussion screening tools could improve assessment of athletes for suspected concussion on the sports sideline.

Maddocks Questions Test For Concussion On Sports Sideline

An important, and well-established, part of an assessment for concussion on the sports sideline under the most recent concussion guidelines is to test an athlete's orientation to time and place by asking the so-called "Maddocks questions."  Because they can be asked by anyone, they are valuable on sports sidelines where no health care professional trained in performing a full sideline screening for concussion is present.

Concussion Identification, Evaluation and Management: A Step-By-Step Process

Management of sport-related concussion involves a step-by-step process beginning before a sports season even starts, say the three newest concussion guidelines, and continuing through on-the-field evaluation, sideline assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and return to play.

Sandbagging A Baseline Test: Much Harder Than One Might Think

Outsmarting or "sandbagging" a baseline neuropsychological test is much harder than an athlete may think, say two recent studies, because they are programmed to automatically "flag" test protocols that seem suspicious.

Impact Sensors: Riddell InSite Impact Response System

The Riddell InSite Impact Response System is a new integrated monitoring and alerting tool designed specifically for the proactive protection of football players based on its Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS) and Sideline Response System (SRS) which have analyzed nearly 1.8+ million impacts since 2003.
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