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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

NIH Study Links Childhood CT Scans To Increased Risk Of Leukemia and Brain Cancer

Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan, says a new study reported in the British medical journal, The Lancet.

King-Devick Test Effective Sideline Concussion Screening Tool, New Study Finds

The King-Devick Test, a simple two-minute test of rapid eye movement, is an accurate "remove-from-play" sideline concussion assessment tool finds a new study by researchers in New Zealand. The rugby study confirms the value of the K-D test as an accurate and reliable method for quick assessment of concussion.

Underreporting of Concussions: Is Monitoring Head Impact Exposure A Way Around The Problem?

Many sports concussion go undetected, say experts, either because athletes fail to self-report concussion symptoms, or because sideline personnel lack the necessary training and experience to identify concussed athletes.  The best way to address the problem of under-reporting may be not to rely on the athletes themselves, game officials, or even sideline observers to call for a concussion assessment, but to use sophisticated helmet sensors to measure impacts to get around the problem altogether.

NFL's Super Bowl Ad Obscured Reality

Most of the buzz about the commercials that aired during this Sunday's Super Bowl was about the Chrysler ad featuring Clint Eastwood, but, for me, the one commercial I won't forget was the 60-second spot by the N.F.L. at the end of the third quarter touting the league's progress since its founding to make the game safer.

The N.F.L.'s Super Bowl commercial touting the league's progress since its founding to make the game safer obscured the reality that league has not done enough to protect its current players from the dangers of head injuries and left too many of its former players struggling in retirement with symptoms of early dementia, depression, and thoughts of suicide.

Computerized Neurocognitive Baseline Concussion Testing At Home: Why I'm Against It

A couple of weeks ago a team and league management technology provider and a neurocognitive testing company announced a partnership to provide online testing for athletes. The announcement prompted emails to MomsTEAM from parents asking for my opinion on how and where to have their children's baseline neurocognitive tests done, and whether they could do them at home.  While I have been fielding similar e-mails for years, the uptick in emails prompted me to do some digging to come up with an answer.

Computerized neurocognitive tests which athletes can take in the comfort of their parent's home may be affordable, but MomsTeam's Brooke de Lench argues that concussion testing should be left to concussion professionals trained in properly administering and interpreting the results, not sold on line for use without supervision.  Leading experts and the Centers for Disease Control agree.

Sarah Burke's Death: A Reminder To Take All Head and Neck Injuries Seriously

Vertebral artery (e.g. whiplash) injuries, such as the one that claimed the life of Canadian freestyle skier, Sarah Burke, can occur to athletes in contact sports, such as football and hockey, and sports where falling is common, such as skateboarding and skiing

Baseline Concussion Testing Products: Caution Urged In Purchase Decision

Accessibility and reliability are two factors to be considered in the purchase of computerized neurocognitive testing programs.

Baseline Neurocognitive Testing Before Winter Sports Activities: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?

I remember one time, when my kids were six, going ice skating at a new rink with my sister Drew, her daughter Courtney, and my triplet sons. The excitement of a new rink and lots of kids zipping around provided for a lot of great fun and laughs, but ended, unfortunately, in an accident and a terrifying trip to the hospital, the memory of which is still vivid.Girl lacing up figure skates

Baseline neurocognitive testing in team sports such as hockey, lacrosse and football is increasingly common, but it might be a good idea to have kids tested before they participate in winter sports such as recreational skating, snowboarding or skiing as well.

Shockbox Helmet Sensor: A Concussion Alert System

Using technology developed for use by the U.S. military in combat helmets as a springboard, a Canadian company, Impakt Protective Inc., recently introduced a revolutionary head impact sensor called ShockboxTM. Installed in a player's helmet, the sensor triggers an alert on a smart phone any time a player suffers an "at risk" hit that may be concussive.
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