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Concussion Recognition & Evaluation

Shockbox Helmet Sensor: A Concussion Alert System

Using technology developed for use by the U.S. military in combat helmets as a springboard, a Canadian company, Impakt Protective Inc., recently introduced a revolutionary head impact sensor called ShockboxTM. Installed in a player's helmet, the sensor triggers an alert on a smart phone any time a player suffers an "at risk" hit that may be concussive.

Unmarked Detour: Long Concussion Journey Begins Before Puck Even Drops

After sustaining a series of hits to her head during the previous week's training, Heidi Taggart asked her ice hockey coach to be excused from goaltending during a game in February 2010 when she began experiencing "flu-like" symptoms.  He told her to "suck it up" and take the ice. During pre-game warm-ups, a teammate's stick hit Heidi in the head during the follow-through from a wrist shot.  She immediately began experiencing concussion symptoms (headache, disorientation, drowsiness), but the injury was not initially thought to be too serious.   It was anything but. As her mom, Dorothy Bedford, now recalls, the road Heidi travelled from that Friday night on the way to recovery from post-concussion syndrome would be marked by a long series of "unmarked detours" taking fourteen months and requiring treatment from more than 10 different medical specialists.

Unmarked Detour: EEG and MRI No Help in Treating Concussion

When her concussed daughter Heidi began feeling  "buzzy" for 60- to 90-seconds at a time, Dorothy Bedford was scared, but diagnostic tests (EEG and MRI) were no help in identifying the reason for her symptoms.

Neurocognitive Testing Lead To Increased Concussion Awareness

It was only when the use of pre-season and post-concussion neurocognitive testing proved that concussions were having a real effect on brain function that the sports and medical community began to take them seriously, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

Concussion Knowledge of Primary Care Doctors Falls Short, Study Says

Many primary care physicians lack confidence in their ability to diagnose and manage concussions, says a new University of Washington study, although doctors receiving a concussion education toolkit were significantly less likely to recommend next day return to play after concussion, consistent with current guidelines.

Reporting Concussion Signs and Symptoms: Be Honest, Be Smart

Concussion expert Dr. William P. Meehan, III says an athlete's failure to report concussions signs or symptoms can delay recovery, result in catastrophic injury in rare cases, and long-term problems.

Difference Between Concussion Sign and Symptom Explained

The difference between a concussion sign and a concussion symptom is that a sign of concussion is one that can be noticed, seen or observed while a symptom is something only the athlete feels or experiences.

New Study Confirms Value of King-Devick Test in Sideline Assessment of Concussion

The King-Devick Test (K-D) provides an accurate and reliable method for sideline assessment of concussion, a new study says, prompting a call by Ralph Nader to mandate its use in youth and high school sports.

Glasgow Coma Scale Used In Evaluating Level of Consciousness, Not Concussion Severity

Emergency medicine provider use the 15-point Glasgow Coma Scale to determine level of consciousness based on responses to various stimuli.  Patients with suspected concussive injury are categorized  as having mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) if they score a 14-15 on on the GCS, but the scale is not useful in assessing the severity of concussion or how long recovery will take, so that the terms mTBI and concussion should not be used interchangeably, says William P. Meehan, III, MD, MomsTeam concussion medicine expert and author of Kids, Sports, and Concussions.
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