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Study First To Prove Benefit Of Cognitive and Physical Rest In Concussion Recovery

A week of strict cognitive and physical rest significantly improves performance of concussed athletes on neurocognitive tests and decreases severity of post-concussion symptoms, a first-of-its-kind study finds. The beneficial effects of the week of rest were seen whether the rest came soon after a concussion or even weeks to months later.

Young Athletes' Self-Assessment Of Concussion Recovery Unreliable Measure Of Return To Play Readiness, Studies Finds

Because adolescent athletes assess their recovery from concussions based on only a small subset of potential symptoms, such self-reports should not be used as the sole factor in return-to-play decisions, say researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who urge that neurocognitive testing results also be considered by clinicians.

Sub-Concussive Hits: A Growing Concern in Youth Sports

Brain trauma among football players may be less the result of violent helmet-on-helmet collisions that cause concussions as the accumulation of sub-concussive blows.  The long-term effects of such repetitive brain trauma are still unknown.

Computerized Neurocognitive Baseline Concussion Testing At Home: Why I'm Against It

A couple of weeks ago a team and league management technology provider and a neurocognitive testing company announced a partnership to provide online testing for athletes. The announcement prompted emails to MomsTEAM from parents asking for my opinion on how and where to have their children's baseline neurocognitive tests done, and whether they could do them at home.  While I have been fielding similar e-mails for years, the uptick in emails prompted me to do some digging to come up with an answer.

Computerized neurocognitive tests which athletes can take in the comfort of their parent's home may be affordable, but MomsTeam's Brooke de Lench argues that concussion testing should be left to concussion professionals trained in properly administering and interpreting the results, not sold on line for use without supervision.  Leading experts and the Centers for Disease Control agree.

Baseline Neurocognitive Testing Before Winter Sports Activities: An Idea Whose Time Has Come?

I remember one time, when my kids were six, going ice skating at a new rink with my sister Drew, her daughter Courtney, and my triplet sons. The excitement of a new rink and lots of kids zipping around provided for a lot of great fun and laughs, but ended, unfortunately, in an accident and a terrifying trip to the hospital, the memory of which is still vivid.Girl lacing up figure skates

Baseline neurocognitive testing in team sports such as hockey, lacrosse and football is increasingly common, but it might be a good idea to have kids tested before they participate in winter sports such as recreational skating, snowboarding or skiing as well.

Neurocognitive Testing Lead To Increased Concussion Awareness

It was only when the use of pre-season and post-concussion neurocognitive testing proved that concussions were having a real effect on brain function that the sports and medical community began to take them seriously, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

Baseline Concussion Testing: Why Sandbagging Is A Bad Idea

Concussion expert Dr. William P. Meehan, III explains why athletes who try to intentionally fail a baseline neurocognitive test in order to be able to return to play sooner after a concussion are only putting themselves at risk.

Paper and Pencil Neuropsychological Testing for Concussions: Valuable But Come with Limitations

Pencil and paper neuropsychological tests have proven useful for identifying cognitive deficits resulting from concussions, and have been available to sports medicine clinicians for years but have a number of limitations.

Computerized Neurocognitive Testing: Important Role in Concussion Evaluation, Return To Play Decision

Computerized neuropsycognitive testing for concussions has become increasingly popular in recent years and have been shown to have value in making the all-important return to play decision.

Concussion Bill of Rights #5: Neuropsychological Testing For Contact and Collision Sports

Parents should have the right to expect, if their child is playing contact or collision sports, that he or she undergo pre-season baseline and post-injury neuropsychological testing as the current consensus statement on concussions recommends for athletes in such sport, regardless of age or competitive level.

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