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King-Devick Test: An Important Part of Sideline Concussion Screening Battery

A new study says that including the King-Devick test, a measure of fast eye movement, along with neurocognitive and balance testing as part of a battery of rapid concussion screening tools could improve assessment of athletes for suspected concussion on the sports sideline.

Lost in Translation: The Perils of Tweeting About Concussions

One of the things I try to do every day is carve out time to keep up with what people are saying on Twitter, and occasionally throwing in my two-cents worth. For those of you reading this blog who follow MomsTEAM on Twitter, it won't come as any big surprise that concussions in sports seems to be the topic that most often lights up the youth sports Twittersphere.

But as anyone active on Twitter also knows, condensing one's thoughts into 140 character "tweets" is often a challenge, and can sometimes leave a lot to be desired, especially when one is talking about a subject as complex as concussions.

Last night was one of those times.

As anyone active on Twitter knows, condensing one's thoughts into 140 character "tweets" is often a challenge, especially when one is talking about a subject as complex as concussions. Last night was one of those times.

King-Devick: New Screening Tool May Dramatically Improve Concussion Detection Rate on Sports Sideline

A new study provides additional evidence that the King-Devick Test, a simple two-minute test of rapid eye movement, is an accurate "remove-from-play" sideline concussion assessment tool which can accurately identify athletes with concussion, even when they neither display obvious concussion signs nor report any symptoms.

Fourth International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport: Personal Observations

A leading sports concussion neuropsychologist and researcher provides her personal observations on the 4th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport, held in Zurich, Switzerland in November 2012.

Concussion Apps For Smartphones

There are at least 20 smartphone applications on sports concussions. Evaluating the apps strictly from the standpoint of their usefulness for parents, here's how they stack up and whether they are worth downloading (updated).

The Unmarked Detour: A Family's Journey Through Post-Concussion Syndrome (Video)

When her daughter Heidi suffered a concussion warming up in goal before a hockey game in February 2010, litle did Dorothy Bedford realize that the night would mark the beginning of a fourteen-month long recovery from post-concussion syndrome requiring three medical leaves of absences and treatment by nearly a dozen medical specialists.

The Unmarked Detour: One Family's Journey Through Post-Concussion Syndrome

When her daughter Heidi suffered a concussion warming up in goal before a hockey game in February 2010, litle did Dorothy Bedford realize that the night would mark the beginning of a fourteen-month long recovery from post-concussion syndrome requiring three medical leaves of absences and treatment by nearly a dozen medical specialists.

 

Shockbox Helmet Sensor: A Concussion Alert System

Using technology developed for use by the U.S. military in combat helmets as a springboard, a Canadian company, Impakt Protective Inc., recently introduced a revolutionary head impact sensor called ShockboxTM. Installed in a player's helmet, the sensor triggers an alert on a smart phone any time a player suffers an "at risk" hit that may be concussive.

Shockbox Helmet Sensor Warns Of Possible Concussion

A revolutionary new product called ShockboxTM triggers an alarm on a smart-phone whenever an athlete suffered a blow to the head hard enough to cause possible concussion so the player can be immediately removed from the game or practice for a sideline assessment.

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