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Baseline Scores On SCAT2 Concussion Test Vary By Youth Athlete's Gender and Concussion History, Says Study

Scores on a test commonly used to assess concussions on the sport sideline vary by an athlete's gender and concussion history, reports a new study.  Establishing an individual baseline for each youth athlete in contact and collision sports is therefore critical to proper management of a subsequent concussion and the timing for safe return to play.

Concussion Follow-Up

After the initial sideline assessment, an athlete with a suspected concussion should not be left alone, should be monitored for deteriorating mental status over the next few hours, and should be further evaluated in a hospital emergency room or doctor's office.

Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3

The SCAT3 is a standardized method of evaluating injured athletes for concussion ages 13 years and older. Although designed for use by medical and health professionals, it includes advice for athletes and parents about signs to watch for in the first 24 to 48 hours after suspected concussion and a list of other important points, including the need for rest and avoiding strenuous activity, and not training or playing sport until medically cleared.

Standardized Assessment of Concussion: A Valuable Tool for Sideline Evaluation

The emerging model of sport concussion assessment now involves the use of brief screening tools to evaluate post-concussion signs and symptoms on the sideline immediately after a concussion and neuropsychological testing to track recovery further out from the time of injury. One of the tools of value for sideline evaluation is called the Standardized Assessment of Concussion.

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