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Concussion Treatment & Recovery

Migraines As Risk Factor for Prolonged Concussion Recovery

A history of pre-existing migraine headaches may be a risk factor for a concussion and may be associated with a prolonged recovery.

Concussion Identification, Evaluation and Management: A Step-By-Step Process

Management of sport-related concussion involves a step-by-step process beginning before a sports season even starts, say the three newest concussion guidelines, and continuing through on-the-field evaluation, sideline assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and return to play.

High Initial Concussion Symptom Score Suggests Longer Recovery, Study Says

What factors predict which athletes recover quickly from concussion and which will take longer has proved to be a vexing question. A new study suggests an elegantly simple and intuitive answer: the athletes who take longer to recover report the most severe symptoms right after injury; the more severe the initial symptoms, the more likely a longer recovery.

The Role of School Psychologist For Students with Sports-Related Concussion

A former school psychologist explains the kinds of services parents should reasonably expect from their child's public school in the event they suffer a concussion, including whether their children are entitled to academic accommodations, such as an Individual Education Plan (IEP) or so-called 504 Plan.

The Six Pillars of Concussion Risk Management: The MomsTEAM Approach

Head injuries in football, as in other contact and collision sports, cannot be completely eliminated, but there ARE steps that can be taken to minimize risk. MomsTEAM's high school football concussion documentary, "The Smartest Team," focuses on "The Six Pillars" of concussion risk management: education, protection, identification, treatment, return to play and retirement.

Number and Type of Symptoms Linked To Prolonged Concussion Recovery, Study Says

High school athletes reporting four or more symptoms of concussion at the time of injury are twice as likely to experience symptoms lasting a week or more, says a 2013 study.

Can Brain Scan Identify Signs of C.T.E.?

Using a sophisticated brain scan, researchers at UCLA have for the first time identified in living patients the telltale signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. While the results are preliminary, the study opens up the possibility of using the scans to develop strategies to prevent C.T.E. and provide treatment for those who have it.

Pediatricians and ER Doctors: More Concussion Training Needed

Although pediatric primary care and emergency medicine ;providers regularly treat concussions, many admit to lacking the training or tools needed to diagnose and manage concussed patients, a new study finds.

Giving Back as a Family

The sport of soccer has given our family so much over the years. When I actually look back at the 35 years I have been married soccer has always been part of our daily lives.

From my college education, to my career as a professional player, to my current career directing Twellman Soccer, this sport has always been part of my life.

The same is true for my three kids. From their education to their careers to their love of the game soccer has always
and continues to be part of their lives.

The love of the sport has and will always be present but now our focus has changed.

Are we listening to the injured athlete?

Traumatic Brain Injury in Kids and Teens Can Impact School Performance

Kids and teens suffering from traumatic brain injury, such as concussion, may struggle with speech, language, and thinking, which can lead to problems reading or memorizing. A school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP) can help a concussed student and his or her family and teachers to create a treatment plan.
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