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Concussion Treatment & Recovery

Persistent Post-Concussion Symptoms Reported By Children And Teens May Be Exaggerated Or Feigned, Study Finds

Some children and adolescents who have continue to report symptoms weeks and months after suffering a concussion may be exaggerating or feigning symptoms in order to get out of schoolwork or sports or for other reasons unrelated to their injury, says a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

Exercise Program Helps Post-Concussion Syndrome By Restoring Normal Cerebral Blood Flow

Controlled aerobic exercise rehabilitation may help restore normal cerebral blood flow regulation in patients with post-concussion syndrome patients, relieving the symptoms they experience during exercise and prolonged cognitive working memory tasks such as fatigue and difficulty concentrating, finds a new study.

Concussion Rate For Female Middle-School-Aged Soccer Players 4 Times Higher Than For High School Athletes

Female middle school soccer players sustained concussions at a rate higher than their high school and college counterparts, most continued to play despite experiencing symptoms, and less than half sought medical attention, a first-of-its-kind study finds.

Full Cognitive Activity After Concussion Delays Recovery, Study Finds

Teens who continue to engage in full cognitive activity after sport-related concussion take from 2 to 5 times longer to recover than those who limit such activity, a new study has found. The findings provide important support for current concussion guidelines recommending cognitive rest during the initial stages of recovery from concussion.

Child-Specific Concussion Management Tools Needed, Study Says

Child-specific tools need to be developed and used for the diagnosis, recovery-assessment and management of their concussions, focusing less on return to play as the goal as return to learn, a new study recommends.

Gender Differences In Concussion Severity And Outcomes May Depend On Female's Menstrual Cycle

A growing body of evidence suggests that females experience more severe symptoms and take longer to recover after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) such as concussions. A new study suggests that such gender differences may in part be due to a sharp drop in hormone levels among females injured during the two weeks prior to their periods.

'Culture of Resistance' for Self-Reporting Concussions, Study Finds

Young athletes in the U.S. face a "culture of resistance" to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

Ensure Successful Return To Classroom After Concussion, Says Pediatrics Group

Helping a student-athlete make a successful return to learning after a concussion is just as important as ensuring their safe return to sports, and requires a team approach involving parents, health care professionals, and schools, says the American Academy of Pediatrics in an important new clinical report.

Post-Concussion Syndrome: New Therapies Offer Hope, Says Mother Of Hockey Star, Caitlin Cahow

In her long road to recovery from post-concussion syndrome, two-time Olympic hockey star Caitlin Cahow had the best help a daughter could ask for, a mom who was there for her, no questions asked.  Caitlin's mom, a physician herself, shares with MomsTEAM's Brooke de Lench her perspective on new treatment therapies.

PBS Stations Begin Airing "The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer"

The Brooke de Lench documentary, "The Smartest Team: Making High School Football Safer," will be broadcast on PBS affiliate stations across the country beginning September 17, 2013.
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