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Concussion Treatment & Recovery

Unmarked Detour: Unprepared Despite Multiple Concussion History

Although her daughter Heidi had suffered multiple concussions in the past (one in second grade during recreational skating, the second more serious concussion in a collision with a softball teammate in ninth grade), and despite thinking she was "concussion savvy," Dorothy Bedford says that, three to four weeks after Heidi suffered a third concussion warming up for an ice hockey game during her junior year in high school, she was unprepared for the "mysterious journey" that lay ahead for both of them.

Unmarked Detour: Early In Concussion Recovery Pain Killers Helped For Headaches And Sleep

Early in her daughter Heidi's concussion recovery, pain killers (Tylenol and prescription medications, Percocet, Toradol), which numbed her headaches and helped her overcome the sleep disturbances associated with her concussion, says Dorothy Bedford.

Unmarked Detour: EEG and MRI No Help in Treating Concussion

When her concussed daughter Heidi began feeling  "buzzy" for 60- to 90-seconds at a time, Dorothy Bedford was scared, but diagnostic tests (EEG and MRI) were no help in identifying the reason for her symptoms.

Unmarked Detour: Concussion Conference At Fenway Park Pays Off

An invitation to an annual concussion conference co-sponsored by Boston and Harvard Universities not only gave Dorothy Bedford a chance to visit Fenway Park, but to hear about the latest concussion research, and meet a concussion specialist whose second opinion provided needed reassurance that her daughter was on the road to recovery.

Unmarked Detour: Lengthy Concussion Recovery Disrupted Family

An athlete's extended recovery from concussion disrupts the family, not only in terms of the financial expense but on day-to-day family life, says a mom whose daughter took 14 months to recover from her concussion.

Concussion Recovery Starts With Both Physical and Cognitive Rest

The most important thing for a student-athlete to do after a concussion is get physical and cognitive rest in order reduce the work the injured brain has to do in order to give it time to heal.

Cognitive Rest After Concussion Critical To Recovery

Because a concussion impacts the brain's cognitive function (those that involve thinking, concentrating, learning and reasoning), not its structure, experts recommend that concussed students limit scholastic and other cognitive activities to allow the brain time to heal.

Cognitive Rest After Concussion Critical To Avoiding Extended Recovery

Not only is it important for concussed students to avoid play but they need to avoid cognitive exertion, says the mom of one concussed athlete, which is critical to making a successful recovery at an early point, instead of having it extended, as it was in her daughter Heidi's case.

Unmarked Detour: Mild Aerobic Exercise Helped Recovery From Post-Concussion Syndrome

Mild aerobic exercise such as walking, following an experimental protocol developed at the State University of New York at Buffalo, helped her daughter Heidi's recovery from post-concussion syndrome (PCS), says her mom, Dorothy Bedford.

Concussion Therapies: Amantadine Shows Potential in Treating Post-Concussion Syndrome

A first-of-its-kind study reports that the drug Amantadine shows promise in treating adolescents who have not spontaneously recovered from concussion following a 3 to 4 weeks of cognitive and physical rest.
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