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Concussion Treatment & Recovery

Youth Sports Concussions: Team Approach Needed

A team approach to concussion management in youth and high school sports, which includes a sports physician, neuropsychologist and athletic trainer, is optimal, especially given the vulnerability of youth to traumatic brain injury.

Can Omega-3 Help Concussion Recovery?

Omega-3 fatty acids may help memory recovery after concussion suggests a 2011 study in rats.  Given their other health benefits, it is "hard to see the harm" of consuming a fish oil supplement after head injury, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

Quitting Contact or Collision Sport After Concussion: Tough On Family, Not Just Athlete

Retiring from contact or collision sports due to concussion history can be emotionally difficult for both athlete and parent.  Athletes who  play other sports, have clear academic goals, high self-esteem, and supportive and responsible parents fare best.

Academic Accommodations After Concussion: Neuropsychologists Play Important Role

The best way to develop a plan to address the academic accommodations a student-athlete will likely need as he or she recovers from a concussion is for your child's school to consult with a neuropsychologist, says MomsTeam expert sports concussion neuropsychologist, Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D.

Concussion Risk Doesn't End with School Year

For an increasing number of kids these days, playing sports doesn't end with the school year.  If anything, the competitive intensity of all-star, tournament, travel ball, and sports camps during summer vacation means increased athletic exposures and risk of concussion.

More Post-Concussion Help For Students In Classroom Needed

An overwhelming majority of both athletes returning to the classroom after a concussion and their parents are "very concerned" that academic performance will be negatively affected, finds a new survey.  Majorities of both athletes and parents surveyed called for schools to do more to support the recovery of students from concussions through academic accommodations, such as extra time to complete tasks, reduced homework, and rest breaks. 

Paper and Pencil Neuropsychological Testing for Concussions: Valuable But Come with Limitations

Pencil and paper neuropsychological tests have proven useful for identifying cognitive deficits resulting from concussions, and have been available to sports medicine clinicians for years but have a number of limitations.

Computerized Neurocognitive Testing: Important Role in Concussion Evaluation, Return To Play Decision

Computerized neuropsycognitive testing for concussions has become increasingly popular in recent years and have been shown to have value in making the all-important return to play decision.

Recovering from Concussion: Teachers Play Important Role

Students with a concussion may have difficulty retaining new information and retrieving information when needed. To help a student remember better, here's a list of "Top 10" cognitive strategies for parents to give to teachers.

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