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Fun & Skill Development v. Winning

After A Loss: Advice for Parents

With the winter sports season in full swing, it is important for parents to remember that, no matter how talented your child may be, there are going to be days when she doesn't play her best or when, despite her best effort, her team loses. How you manage both the ups and the inevitable downs will play a large role in whether your child has a successful youth sports experience.

Twelve Signs of A Good Youth Sports Program

The very best youth sports programs, says Brooke de Lench, share 12 characteristics.

"Winning Takes Care of Everything" and Other Sporting Myths

Nike's latest edgy ad in which Tiger Woods claims that, "Winning takes care of everything," has evoked a wide range of responses in the media, and, one might hope, around the family dinner table. After all, why miss a teachable moment when you're a parent of a young athlete? But what exactly is Nike's message, wonders one commentator on sports and society.

Handling Pressure In Sports: Parents Can Help

As a parent, you can help your child learn how to positively deal with pressure and stress during sports events, teaching them a valuable life skill that will benefit them in other areas of their life, too.

David Kittner (a/k/a Youth Fitness Guy): Adults in Youth Sports Need To Always Remember It's For The Kids

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. We decided at MomsTEAM to designate June as National Sports Dads Month and all month long have been hearing from a fascinating range of men about what they have learned as sports dads, what their kids have learned, and, if they could change anything about today's youth sports, what it would be.

Today, we hear from longtime youth sports fitness expert and instructor, David Kittner:

MomsTEAM: Were you an athlete and what sports did you play as a youth (under 19)?Kittner family tree

A sports dad, coach, and longtime youth fitness instructor thinks the adults involved in youth sports, including league administrators, coaches and parents, need an attitude adjustment: to remember, first and foremost, that the game is for the kids.

Dan Clemens (Baseball Coach and Motivational Speaker): Positive Experience For Kids Should Be Everyone's Goal

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. At MomsTEAM we think sports dads deserve to be honored, not just on the third Sunday in June, but for an entire month. So we have designated June as National Sports Dads Month and invited some veteran sports dads to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions (the same ones we asked sports moms in May).

So far this month we have heard from a fascinating array of fathers, from a former Major League Baseball general manager, to a Minnesota hockey coach and safety advocate, from a sociologist with an expertise in gender and sports to a pediatric sports medicine doctor.

A longtime baseball coach, author and motivational speaker says coaches, parents, umpires and league officials to understand that they are all on the same team with the same goal: give our kids the best possible youth sports experience.

Hal Tearse (Hockey Coach): Less Pressure To Win and More Patience From Parents Needed

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. At MomsTEAM we think sports dads deserve to be honored, not just on the third Sunday in June, but for an entire month. So we have designated June as National Sports Dads Month and invited some veteran sports dads to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions (the same ones we asked sports moms in May). We will post a new blog for every day of June, which we hope you will find interesting, empowering, and informative, and that you will share them with your family and friends.

Longtime hockey coach and Coach in Chief of Minnesota Hockey says if he could "flip a switch" and change one thing about the culture of youth sports is would be less pressure to win and more patience on the part of parents.

Dan Evans (Former Dodgers GM): Let Coaches Coach, Parents Parent, and Players Play

Being the father of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. At MomsTEAM we think sports dads deserve to be honored, not just on the third Sunday in June, but for an entire month. So we have designated June as National Sports Dads Month and invited some veteran sports dads to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions (the same ones we asked sports moms in May). We will post a new blog for every day of June, which we hope you will find interesting, empowering, and informative, and that you will share them with your family and friends.

Today we hear from Dan Evans, President/CEO of Evans Baseball Consulting and former General Manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

A longtime MLB executive and former GM of the Los Angeles Dodgers says the three biggest faults he has with today's youth sports are the unrealistic expectations set for participants, the inability of parents to relinquish control, and a failure to keep the focus on making the experience a positive one for the youth.

Rena Stover (Basketball Mom): Need More Emphasis On Skill Development, Less On Tournament Play

Being the mother of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. So momsTEAM has designated May as Sports Moms Month and is celebrating by asking some of our favorite sports moms to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions.

So far this month we have heard from a fascinating range of sports moms, from a mom of an Olympic athlete to moms who were themselves Olympic athletes, from a mom of two former minor league baseball players to a Minnesota hockey mom and author.

Today, we hear from Rena Stover, a mother from California with two sons playing Division 1 basketball, who blogs on college recruiting issues for Student Athlete LabTM.

A mother of two Division 1 college basketball players wants to see more of an emphasis on skill development and not so much energy on kids playing in tournaments.

The Shoe Goes on the Other Foot -- For Real

So this is what it feels like. To be yelled at while playing. To be told you're not good enough to be on a team ... by someone who's not even playing herself and isn't an expert or a true, certified coach -- just another player who wants to play certain people for a specific end that benefits her ego, not anyone else's real development.

Youth athletes should feel empowered to say, "This coach does not have MY best interests at heart and I need to find that team myself." It truly does not matter if the athlete has professional aspirations or not, the issue is live game or match experience for personal improvement.
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