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The Shoe Goes on the Other Foot -- For Real

So this is what it feels like. To be yelled at while playing. To be told you're not good enough to be on a team ... by someone who's not even playing herself and isn't an expert or a true, certified coach -- just another player who wants to play certain people for a specific end that benefits her ego, not anyone else's real development.

Youth athletes should feel empowered to say, "This coach does not have MY best interests at heart and I need to find that team myself." It truly does not matter if the athlete has professional aspirations or not, the issue is live game or match experience for personal improvement.

Do Players On High School Varsity Deserve At Least Some Playing Time?

I'm writing this blog under the protestations of my 15-year-old son. He would prefer that I don't write this at all, or that I write it anonymously, so that he doesn't suffer the playing-time repercussions from his coach, but it can't get any worse than it is. And, frankly, I will be completely quiet if someone - anyone - can explain to me the benefits - to the coaching staff, the team record, AND the kids - of having an entire group of players (say, 5 or 6) ride the bench the entire season and see no playing time.

Is it okay for bench-warmers on a high school varsity baseball team to get no playing time whatsoever, even when their team is way ahead? One sports mom is looking for answers.

Youth Coaches: Meaningful Playing Time For Every Player Is Job One

At levels below high school, kids sign up for sports to play, not to watch other kids play or watch adults coach or referees ref.   The number one job of a coach - whether it be basketball or any other team sport -  is to make sure every child gets meaningful playing time in every game.

Minimum Playing Time Rule: Enforce It Across the Board

I have done years of research in the field of youth sports. Probably as much as some researchers have. I have also coached football for many years with great success. What I mean by success is that I have winning teams with happy parents for what I accomplished with their kids and every kid gets to play the entire game.

The local youth rec. football league in our town has a minimum playing
time rule that each kid will play the whole game on either offense or
defense. It's a good rule and it works. I have yet to hear one kid or
parent ever complain about this rule.

Youth Basketball Survey: Keeping Kids in The Game & Having Fun Are Keys To Better Experience

Finding ways to keep kids playing and making programs more fun are seen by coaches, administrators and volunteers as the best ways to improve the youth basketball experience in a survey conducted by youth basketball expert and reform advocate, Bob Bigelow.

Should I Be Ashamed For Feeling This Way About My Daughter's Sport Team?

If anyone who comes on this site has read anything I’ve written you should pretty much be aware that I’m on a one man crusade to stop coaches from abusing some kids through the practicing of benching, or essentially giving a player on the team either no, or very, very little, meaningful playing time.

Young Athletes Offer Life Lessons For All Of Us

Wanting to win is understandable. But in Doug Abrams' fourth annual countdown of top youth sports stories, five examples of exceptional sportsmanship involving disabled athletes confronting special challenges serve as a reminder to all of us that the final score is much less important than it seems.
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