Home » Health & Safety Channel » Heat Safety

Heat Safety

Do Youth Athletes Tolerate Sports Drinks Less Well Than Adults?

In response to a recent MomsTeam article reporting on the American Academy of Pediatrics' clinical report on sports and energy drinks, a reader, a high school cross-country coach, suggesting that youth athletes tolerated sports drinks less well than water. We wondered whether he was right. MomsTeam's youth sports hydration expert, Dr. Susan Yeargin, says no: tolerance is a question of liquid volume and workout intensity, not drink composition.

Sports Drinks for Sports, Energy Drinks Never, Says Pediatrics Group

Sports drinks should be consumed by children and adolescents only when there is a need for fluid, carbohydrate and electrolyte replenishment during and after prolonged, vigorous sports participation, while the ingestion of energy drinks should avoided completely, recommends the American Academy of Pediatrics in a report published in the journal Pediatrics.

Tips for Exercising Safely in the Heat

With the end of winter finally here, temperatures will continue to rise over the next few months. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has teamed up with the Korey Stringer Institute (KSI) to prepare a list of important tips that people of all ages can follow to enjoy physical activity and exercise and also reduce the risk of exertional heat illness that may occur from activity in the spring and summer.

Energy Drinks Pose Serious Health Risks to Children,Teens and Young Adults Says New Study

Energy drinks may pose a risk for serious adverse health effects in some children, especially those with diabetes, seizures, cardiac abnormalities or mood and behavior disorders, says a new study in the March 2011 issue of Pediatrics. Reviewing data gleaned from a meta-search of the medical literature via PubMed (an online data base of medical journals) and print and trade media via Google, researchers at the University of Miami conclude that energy drinks have no therapeutic benefit to children, and both the known and unknown properties of the ingredients, combined with reports of toxicity, may put some children at risk for adverse health events.

Cold Weather Sports: Recognizing and Preventing Dehydration, Hypothermia and Frostbite

Spending time outdoors is fun, even in the cold of winter. But, just as in warmer weather, special precautions need to be taken when exercising in cold weather to avoid dehydration, hypothermia, and frostbite. Here are some things to consider if you or your children are playing sports in the cold.

Swimmers Have Special Hydration Needs

As any parent of a competitive age-group swimmer knows, an indoor pool tends to be a very hot and humid place even at the best of times. Pack in all the competitors and spectators at a day-long meet and the temperatures soar, with athletes in or around the pool losing fluids at a high rate.  Practices for competitive swimmers also tend to last a long time, during which athletes not only burn a lot of calories but lose a lot of water and electrolytes.

Ask Dr. Lindsay: Fueling Youth Sports Performance

Dr. Lindsay Baker, a senior scientist at the Gatorade Sports Science Institute answers a few frequently asked questions about   why it is important for young athletes to stay hydrated and consume carbohydrates so they are healthy, safe and have an athletic edge.

 

.

High School Football Players Most Prone to Heat Illness, CDC Says

U.S. high school athletes suffer an estimated 9,237 time-loss heat illnesses every year that are serious enough to keep them out of sports for one or more days, according to a new, first-of-its kind report from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC), with football players most prone to heat illness.

Performance Nutrition for Football: Replacing Electrolytes Prevents Muscle Cramps

The loss of electrolytes such as sodium and potassium through sweat can lead to muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting and even death.  Electrolytes are minerals (sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and chloride) which send messages to nerves and muscles throughout the body,  and are involved with muscle contraction and relaxation during exercise, so that an imbalance can impact the actual contraction of the muscle itself.

Performance Nutrition for Football: Staying Hydrated for Two-A-Day Practices

During pre-season, staying hydrated is one of an athlete's top priorities. Accurate hydration regulates body temperature, fluid, and electrolyte balance, and is essential for comfort, optimal performance, and safety. Hot humid weather, padding and uniforms, along with two-a-days can increase sweat and electrolyte losses tenfold.
Syndicate content