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Heat Safety

Over-Hydration (Hyponatremia): Another Point of View

In a recent article for MomsTEAM, sports nutrition expert Nancy Clark discussed the subject of over-hydration (hyponatremia). MomsTEAM's sports hydration expert weighs in with some additional thoughts.

Can Education Help Keep Youth Athletes Well-Hydrated?

If you want your youth athlete to arrive at practices and games well-hydrated, and to maintain that status during and after sports, it stands to reason that educating them about the benefits of proper hydration could make a difference? But does it?  MomsTEAM's hydration expert says the studies suggest that education alone doesn't work.

Safety Comes First, No Matter Sport or Season

The winter sports season is in full swing, and spring sports are a ways off, but safety comes first, no matter what the sport or the season. Here's a sixteen-point safety checklist to keep athletes in the game.

Exertional Heat Illness Rate Highest In High School Football, Study Finds

There is good news and bad news in a new study on exertional heat illness in high school sports: the bad news is that the rate for football players is 11 times higher that of all other sports combined. The good news is that, despite a rash of heat-related deaths (6 in 2011 alone, all in football), the overall rate of EHI across all high school sports is low and dropping.

Does Genetic Mutation Explain Why Only Some Sickle Cell Trait Athletes Suffer Exertional Sickling?

Athletes with sickle cell trait (SCT) are at increased risk of life-threatening heat stroke from a condition called exertional sickling, with heat, dehydration, asthma, high-intensity exercise and high altitude known risk factors. But why do some SCT athletes never suffer from exertional sickling or heat illness while others do (with some cases resulting in death)? A new study hopes to answer that question.

Sodium, Muscle Cramps and Sweat Loss: Tips for Sweaty Athletes

Over-hydration can be as dangerous to your health as dehydration. So what does a sweaty athlete need to know about staying adequately hydrated without stomach sloshing? Here are some tips.

Exertional Heat Stroke: A Must-See Video

Since our launch in August 2000, MomsTEAM has been educating parents, coaches, athletic trainers and players on the dangers of heat illness, how to prevent exertional heat stroke - particularly among football players who are most at risk during pre-season practice - and how heat stroke should be treated if and when it occurs.  

MomsTEAM and the Korey Stringer Institute have been educating parents, coaches, athletic trainers, and athletes for years on the dangers of exertional heat stroke and how to prevent the sudden death of athletes. Here is a great new video from KSI that every parent of an athlete, regardless of sport, should watch.

Fox 40's Heat Alert Mouth Guard: A Game Changer Like Their Whistle?

The new Heat Alert mouth guard changes colors if an athlete’s core temperature goes over 102 degrees F, in effect a heat stroke early warning system. Whether it will be a game changer like Fox 40's pea-less whistle remains to be seen. 

Do Children Handle Heat As Well As Adults?

The myth that children are more vulnerable to heat than adults is based on the first studies of youth exercising in the heat conducted in the 1970's and 1980's. More recent research shows that, while youth use a different thermoregulation strategy than adults, they are still efficient at dissipating and handling the heat, at least in mild to moderately hot conditions.

New Jersey Athletic Trainers To Hold Third Annual Sports Safety Summit

MomsTEAM has consistently supported athletic trainers' groups, both at the national (NATA) and state level, in their efforts to improve youth sports safety, both through education and by advocating for ATs in every high school (less than half of U.S. high schools have an AT on staff, although the percentages vary dramatically from state to state).

One of the most active athletic trainers' association at the state level is in New Jersey, which was the first state to require by law that coaches receive safety training, is among the 40 states that have enacted strong youth concussion safety laws, and has been a leader in advocating for academic accommodations for concussed student-athletes. 

Athletic trainers are essential to making youth sports as safe as it can be.  Educational programs, such as the Athletic Trainers Society of New Jersey's third annual sports safety summit on August 1, 2012 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, are important to educating health care professionals on safety issues, including concussions, heat illness, sudden cardiac death and overuse injuries.
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