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Heat Safety

Energy Drinks: Frequently Asked Questions

Despite the popularity of energy drinks, especially among teens, both the National Federation of State High School Associations and American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommend against their consumption by children and adolescents because of their potential adverse health effects.

High School Football Coach Charged With Negligent Homicide in Heat-Related Death: A Needed Wake-Up Call?

The news last year that a Kentucky high school football coach was charged with reckless homicide in the heat-related death of 15-year-old Max Gilpin was not a shock to me.*

Survey Reveals Misconceptions About Beverages And Hydration

According to a recent survey, almost 80 percent of U.S. adults believe they need to drink eight glasses of water each day to stay hydrated while 72 percent do not believe they get adequate amounts of water from their daily diets and typical drinking habits.

Blowing Cool, Dry Air Through Football Shoulder Pads Reduces Heat Illness Risk

Blowing cool, dry air flowing under and through football shoulder pads reduces core
body temperature and heart rate dramatically, thereby reducing the likelihood of heat illness,
says a 2008 study.

Football Players At Greater Risk of Heat Illness

At least five football players and one coach died from heat stroke in the summer of 2011.  An August 2008 study by researchers at University of Florida says there are eight factors that make football players are especially vulnerable to heat illness.

Dehydration At Summer Sports Camps Common, Studies Say

If your child is heading off to sports camp this summer, experts say that the chances are he or she will be dehydrated at camp.  According to studies at the University of Connecticut, between 50 and 75 percent of boys and girls attending summer sports camps are significantly dehydrated, with 25 to 30 percent of the campers studied showed signs of serious dehydration, putting them at increased risk of heat-related illnesses.

Too Hot to Play Sports? Depends on Heat Index

When the heat index is above 95 degrees, athletes, especially children, are at increased risk of heat-related illness. Cancelling or modifying practices and games, or taking others steps to reduce the risk of heat illness, should be taken.

Dehydration: Signs and Symptoms

Dehydration can begin when an athlete loses as little as 1 percent of body weight. In a 70-pound child, that is less than 1 pound of weight lost through sweat. As little as a 2% decrease in body weight from fluid loss (e.g. 1.2 lb for a 60-lb athlete, 2.4 pounds for a 120-pound athlete) can lead to a significant decrease in muscular strength and stamina.

 

 

 

 

Heat Illnesses: Basic Information

Athletes who exercise in hot or humid weather are prone to three different types of heat illnesses: heat cramps, heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Reducing Heat Illness Risk in Youth Football

Youth football coaches should adopt practice modifications and employ a strategy to acclimatize players to perform in the heat, along with a fluid replacement strategy in anticipation of young players who begin practice already dehydrated, according to new recommendations from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the world leader in the scientific and medical aspects of sports and exercise. The guidelines are outcomes from a recent expert panel convened for an ACSM scientific roundtable on youth football and heat stress.

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