Heat Index

NATA Releases Executive Summary Of Revised Exertional Heat Illness Position Statement

NATA has released an executive summary of a new position statement on exertional heat illnesses revising its 2002 statement to reflect new research and expert consensus.

My Son’s Coach Is Making Him Wear Pads In 100 Degree Heat — What Can I Do?

I have really been feeling the heat lately, both literally and figuratively.

It began when I travelled to the steambath that was Williamsburg, Virginia last weekend to give two talks to over 1,000 parents of some of the most elite high school football players in the nation attending a four-day training camp, and the heat didn't let up when I returned to my office this week.

I have really been feeling the heat lately, both literally and figuratively. t began when I travelled to the steambath that was Williamsburg,
Virginia to give two talks to over 1,000 parents of some of
the most elite high school football players in the nation attending a
four-day training camp, and the heat didn't let up when I returned to my
office.

Too Hot to Play Sports? Depends on Heat Index

When the heat index is above 95 degrees, athletes, especially children, are at increased risk of heat-related illness. Cancelling or modifying practices and games, or taking others to reduce the risk of heat illness, should be taken.

Modify or Cancel Games or Practices In High Heat or Humidity

Extremely hot or humid weather may require that sports practices or games be modified or even cancelled because of the risk of heat illness. In deciding whether to do so, you should keep in mind that hot, dry weather can be extremely dangerous. Because sweat evaporates very quickly in such conditions, your child won't feel sweaty, and neither you nor your child may recognize how much water he or she has lost. As the relative humidity increases, the effectiveness of sweating in cooling the body also decreases. When the relative humidity is high, sweat drips off the skin so that the cooling benefit of evaporation is lost even at cooler temperatures, resulting in a build-up of body heat.

NOAA Heat Index Measures Risk of Heat Illness

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed a heat index chart parents and coaches can use to determine when heat and humidity have reached the point where athletes are at serious risk of heat illnesses, such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion or even heat stroke.

Syndicate content