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Parent-Child Communication

After A Loss: Advice for Parents

With the winter sports season in full swing, it is important for parents to remember that, no matter how talented your child may be, there are going to be days when she doesn't play her best or when, despite her best effort, her team loses. How you manage both the ups and the inevitable downs will play a large role in whether your child has a successful youth sports experience.

Excessive Adult Praise For Youth Athletes Can Backfire For Those With Low Self-Esteem, Study Suggests

Parents and other adults are inclined to heap the highest praise on children with low self-esteem who are most likely to actually be hurt by the compliments, finds a new study, with important implications for youth sports parents.

Effective Communication: A Key To Raising High-Performing Athlete

Strong communication skills are a fundamental component of raising a high-performing athlete and an essential part of keeping them in sports throughout their childhood and making them an athlete for life, says the author of a new sports parenting book.

From Son Up to Son Down: A Middle School Football Game-Day Diary

 

The big day finally has arrived! Who is ready for some Tuesday night football? After a summer of workouts, drills, and tournaments, it is finally time for my son to use all the skills he has learned on the football field.

After 8 years of playing against the other neighborhood school teams, the 7th grade is finally together as one team. The first game is a big one. The schedule has 7th grade as the away team, so it comes with the added bonus of traveling on a bus with 100 + of your favorite 12- and 13-year-old boys. Just bless the coaches right now!

So here is the game-day journal of just another football mom, navigating her way through the waters of 7th grade football!

After 8 years of playing against the other neighborhood school teams, a Texas youth football player begins 7th grade football. Want to know what it's like for his mom? Well, here's her game-day journal.

Self-Awareness Is Critical To Successful Sports Parenting, Says Author of New Book

Do you possess sports parenting self-awareness?Have you considered how you appear to your child if you look upset, disappointed, or angry at their games? If not, it's time you do. Being mindful of your own behavior and moods are critically important for every mom, dad, grandparent, or anyone else involved in youth sports, says the co-author of the new book,  "Raising Your Game - Over 100 Accomplished Athletes Help You Guide Your Girls and Boys Through Sports."

Tammy Beasley (Diet Specialist): Biggest Lesson Learned As Sports Mom Is Difference Between Failure and Unfortunate

Being the mother of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. So momsTEAM has designated May as Sports Moms Month and is celebrating by asking some of our favorite sports moms to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions.

So far this month we have heard from a fascinating range of sports moms, from a mom of an Olympic athlete to moms who were themselves Olympic athletes, from a mom of two former minor league baseball players to a Minnesota hockey mom and author.

Today, we hear from sports mom and diet guru, Tammy Beasley:

A sports nutritionist, eating disorder specialist, and sports mom says the biggest lesson her boys taught her was to learn the difference between failure and unfortunate.

Advice to Sports Parents: Stress Fun, Building Skills

With the increasing focus in youth sports on success, a sports psychologist and former elite short track cyclist says parents should emphasize practice to play, leaving their expectations at home on game day, and being motivated by a desire to have fun, not achieve results.

Parents Should Support, Not Criticize Sports Performance

The last thing a child needs to hear on the sports sideline is a parent giving coaching pointers or putting pressure on them to perform. What they want most is unconditional support and encouragement.

Setting Boundaries But Supporting Independence Work Best For Sports Parents, Study Says

Parents who set boundaries and expectations for their teenage daughters but encouraged independence within those limits were better able to gauge their child's mood, provide feedback on their child's sports performance at the right time, and maintain open lines of communication, a Canadian study finds.

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