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Regular Sports and Energy Drink Use By Teens Linked With Cluster of Unhealthy Behaviors

Weekly consumption of sports drinks and energy drinks among adolescents is significantly associated with higher consumption of other sugar-sweetened beverages, cigarette smoking, and screen media use, according to a new study.

Sports Nutrition On the Go: Advice for Parents Is Drink Up, Load Up, Refuel, and Replenish

To help on-the-go sports parents, here are four important sports nutrition points to remember and some tips on how to plan ahead for the hustle and bustle of the fall sports seasons: drink up, load up, refuel, and replenish

Sodium, Muscle Cramps and Sweat Loss: Tips for Sweaty Athletes

Over-hydration can be as dangerous to your health as dehydration. So what does a sweaty athlete need to know about staying adequately hydrated without stomach sloshing? A controversial book suggests, for starters, ignoring the hype of the sports drink industry in selling what amounts to salted sugar water.

High Salt Diet Linked To Greater Soft Drink Consumption and Increased Childhood Obesity Risk

One way to fight childhood obesity may be to reduce dietary intake of salt by children, says a new study. Reducing the amount of salt may help reduce the amount of sugary beverages consumed, which in turn, may lower childhood obesity risk.

Sports Drinks: Clearing Up The Confusion

Parents in a recent study were unsure about whether sports drinks were appropriate and under what circumstances. So MomsTEAM asked a sports dietitian and mom to clear up the confusion. Here's what she told us.

Journalist Julie Deardorff: Modeling Healthy Lifestyle For Kids Is Key

Being the mother of an athlete is a challenging yet rewarding role. At momsTEAM we think sports moms deserve to be honored, not just on the second Sunday in May, but for an entire month. So we have designated May as National Sports Moms Month and invited some veteran sports moms to share their wisdom by responding to a series of questions. We will post a new blog for every day of May, which we hope you will find interesting, empowering, and informative, and that you will share them with your family and friends.

Today we hear from one of momsTEAM's favorite journalists, Julie Deardorff, a health reporter and consumer watchdog for the Chicago Tribune, avid cyclist, and sports mom:

An award-winning health journalist and sports mom says the biggest lesson she has learned from her five-year-old son is not to push him to sports: if he wants to dig holes or play with trucks instead of kicking a soccer ball, she's okay with that.

Do Youth Athletes Tolerate Sports Drinks Less Well Than Adults?

In response to a recent MomsTeam article reporting on the American Academy of Pediatrics' clinical report on sports and energy drinks, a reader, a high school cross-country coach, suggesting that youth athletes tolerated sports drinks less well than water. We wondered whether he was right. MomsTeam's youth sports hydration expert, Dr. Susan Yeargin, says no: tolerance is a question of liquid volume and workout intensity, not drink composition.

Sports Drinks Improve Performance in Stop and Go, High-Intensity Sports

Attention sports moms: still skeptical that sports drinks actually do what they say they do - help increase endurance for young athletes in stop-and-go, high-intensity team sports like soccer, football, ice hockey, basketball, volleyball, and lacrosse - and aren't just advertising hype? Well now you don't have to take their word for it, there's scientific proof.

Sports Drinks for Sports, Energy Drinks Never, Says Pediatrics Group

Sports drinks should be consumed by children and adolescents only when there is a need for fluid, carbohydrate and electrolyte replenishment during and after prolonged, vigorous sports participation, while the ingestion of energy drinks should avoided completely, recommends the American Academy of Pediatrics in a report published in the journal Pediatrics.

Sports Drinks Linked To Healthier Food Choices, More Physical Activity: Study

Consumption of flavored and sports beverages (FSBs) by eighth- and eleventh-grade students is positively linked to the consumption of healthy foods, such as milk, fruit and vegetables, and to increased levels of physical activity but increased consumption of soda pop has the opposite effect, says a new study reported in the October 2010 print issue of the journal Pediatrics.
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