News & Studies

SmartTeams Play Safe Summit, Pilot Programs, And "The Today Show" : It Was Quite The Week!

Today, I begin my blog again after taking the full summer off from writing.

The reason for my summer hiatus, at least from blogging, wasn't that I was relaxing on the beach or by the pool (oh, if only). 

No, it was because I was at my desk at MomsTEAM Institute working hard on two major initiatives: our inaugural SmartTeams Play Safe Summit at Harvard Medical School, and the launch of our six SmartTeam pilot projects.Brooke de Lench and Coach Bobby Hosea at Smart Teams Play Safe Summit

Today, Brooke de Lench begins blogging again after a summer off while she worked on two major initiatives: MomsTEAM Institute's inaugural SmartTeams Play Safe Summit at Harvard Medical School, and the launch of six SmartTeam pilot programs.

SmartTeams Play Safe™ 2014 Summit To Present Health & Safety Best Practices

Harvard Medical School’s Joseph B. Martin Conference Center will be the site for a groundbreaking youth sports health and safety summit on Monday, September 15, 2014. Sponsored by MomsTEAM Institute, a leading youth sports health and safety think tank and watchdog group, the SmartTeams Play Safe™: Protecting the Health & Safety of the Whole Child In Youth Sports By Implementing Best Practices summit will feature a series of educational, "TED-talk"-style presentations by nationally-recognized clinicians, researchers and youth sports safety advocates.

Five Commonly Used Sports Medicine Tests and Procedures Parents Should Question

The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) has released a list of five tests and procedures that are commonly ordered but not always necessary in sports medicine, to facilitate conversations between patients and physicians about what care is really necessary.

Standardizing Preparticipation Physical Exams Is Goal Of New NATA Position Statement

A standardized process for conducting the preparticipation physical examination is needed to ensure a safe playing environment for athletes and to help identify those conditions that may predispose an athlete to injury or sudden death, says the National Athletic Trainers' Association in a new position statement.

Only One in Four Adolescents Meet Physical Activity Guidelines

Only about a quarter of youth aged 12 to 15 years get the 60 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous exercise recommended in the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines, finds a new study.

Teen Athletes at Risk for Medication Misuse

Teen athletes derive many positive benefits from participating in sports, but their increased risk of sports-related injuries may also heighten their risk for medication misuse and abuse, especially for boys, finds a recent study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

NATA Sets Guidelines For Managing Sports Injuries in High School and College Settings

The National Athletic Trainers' Association inter-association task force recommendations on best practices for sports medicine management for secondary schools and colleges can be used by parents to evaluate whether their child's school is providing adequate sports medicine services for its athletes.

NATA Launches Safe Sports School Award Program

The National Athletic Trainers' Association has launched the first-ever Safe Sports School award program to recognize secondary schools around the country that provide safe environments for student athletes and reinforce the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment.

Student-Athletes' Bill of Rights Offered As Resolution in U.S. House of Representatives

The Secondary School Student Athletes' Bill of Rights has been introduced as House Resolution 72 (H. Res. 72) by Congressman Jim Gerlach of Pennsylvania. The bill is based on a bill of rights created by the Youth Sports Safety Alliance, an organization committed to keeping young athletes safe founded by the National Athletic Trainers' Association which now counts more than 100 organizations (including MomsTEAM) as members.

More Sleep Linked To Improved Alertness, Behavior in Children

A little more sleep helps children ages 7 to 11 stay more alert and be less restless and impulsive in school, says a new study in the journal Pediatrics.
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