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mild traumatic brain injury

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

CTE: Is Media Narrative Ahead Of The Science?

The prevailing media narrative is that concussions or repetitive subconcussive blows "cause" chronic traumatic encephalopthy (CTE) and that there is a proven link between the two. It thus may come as a surprise that, despite widespread media coverage and speculation regarding the late-life or post-retirement risks of cognitive impairment in athletes who engaged in sports involving repetitive trauma, there has been very little in the way of peer-reviewed  literature to support that conclusion, leading many respected concussion researchers to view it as "scientifically premature."

Should Kids With ADHD Avoid Contact Sports?

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who sustain mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) such as concussion are more likely to be moderately disabled after injury than those who sustain mTBI without ADHD, finds a new study, which suggests that children with ADHD be encouraged to avoid contact sports that put them at increased risk of TBI. 

Effect of Concussion On Children's Brains Linger Long After Symptoms Clear

Structural abnormalities in children's brains persist in children and teens for months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion, even when symptoms have cleared and results on neurocognitive tests have returned to normal, finds a sobering new study in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Centers for Disease Control Taps MomsTEAM's Moser For Expert Concussion Panel

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has named MomsTEAM's expert sports concussion neuropsychologist Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph.D., to its Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Panel of Expertm which will develop clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of mTBI.  

Neal Alpiner (Exercise Medicine Specialist): Helps Guide Athletes and Families Through Concussion Maze

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from Neal Alpiner, MD, a exercise medicine specialist in Royal Oak, Michigan.

By Neal Alpiner, MD

A physician board certified in both Pediatrics and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) allows him to evaluate and treat patients with a wide variety of needs, from musculoskeletal to orthopedic to neurologic conditions.

Glasgow Coma Scale Used In Evaluating Level of Consciousness, Not Concussion Severity

Emergency medicine provider use the 15-point Glasgow Coma Scale to determine level of consciousness based on responses to various stimuli.  Patients with suspected concussive injury are categorized  as having mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) if they score a 14-15 on on the GCS, but the scale is not useful in assessing the severity of concussion or how long recovery will take, so that the terms mTBI and concussion should not be used interchangeably, says William P. Meehan, III, MD, MomsTeam concussion medicine expert and author of Kids, Sports, and Concussions.

NOCSAE Approves $1.1 Million In Grants To Fund Concussion Research

The National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) has awarded $1.1 million in research grants to advance the science of sports medicine - specifically related to concussion.

Head Trauma and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Cause And Effect Relationship 'Scientifically Premature'

The conclusion that chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is caused by concussions and repetitive subconcussive brain trauma is scientifically premature, say an increasing number of researchers.

Concussions in High School Sports: Study Sheds New Light On Causes, Symptoms and Management

A 2011 study confirms that football is still responsible for the majority of concussions at the high school level and that the symptoms of concussion clear in most cases within one week, but also shows for the first time the important role computerized neuropsychological testing is playing in concussion assessment and return to play decisions.  
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