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Female Athletes

Knee Pain: Physical Therapy Can Help

Physical therapy can help reduce debilitating knee pain from Patellofemoral Syndrome, a condition most commonly seen in female athletes.

Lindsey Remmers (Sports Dietitian): Helped Athlete Overcome Eating Disorder

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from sports nutritionist Lindsey Remmers.

By Lindsey Remmers MS, RD, CSSD, LMNT

A sports dietitian in the athletic department of a leading NCAA Division 1 university talks about how she helped a college athlete overcome an eating disorder and achieve a personal best in her sport.

Kemi Oguntala (Pediatrician): Impacts Lives of Teen Athletes In Many Ways

In recognition of April as National Youth Sports Safety Month, MomsTeam has asked 30 experts to write a blog answering two questions: first, how or why did they get into their field, and second, how have they made a difference in the life of a youth athlete in the past year.

Today, we hear from Kemi Oguntala, MD, a pediatric and adolescent medicine physician at a teen clinic in South San Francisco, California.

 

By Kemi Oguntala, MD

How did I get into my field?

I'm a pediatrician with extra training in adolescent medicine.  I run a busy teen clinic in the Bay Area, where I'm called Dr. O, the Teen Doc.

A pediatrician who runs a teen clinic in the San Francisco Bay area talks about how she is able to help so many adolescent athletes, including those with eating disorders suggesting a diagnosis of the female athlete triad.

Female Soccer Players At Risk for Stress Fractures, Long-Term Health Problems: Study

Elite female soccer players are at risk for menstrual irregularities and stress fractures from the combination of intense training and insufficient nutrition, says a new study.

Warm-Up Program Cuts ACL Injury Rate In Adolescent Female Soccer Players By Two-Thirds: Study

A 15-minute neuromuscular warm-up program significantly reduced the ACL injury rate in teenage female soccer players, finds a new study. Players who used the program at least once a week also had significant decrease in rates of severe knee injury and other acute knee injuries.

Training Program Can Reduce Female ACL Injury Risk, Improve Athletic Performance

Two ACL injury prevention programs significantly reduce injury rates among female athletes while improving athletic performance, says a 2011 study.  Experts hope the findings will lead to greater compliance with training and widespread adoption of intervention programs.

Preventing ACL Injuries In Female Athletes: Team Approach Worked

Working collaboratively, a team of physical therapists, strength and conditioning coaches, head coaches, and athletic trainers designed an ACL injury prevention program that has reduced the incidence of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among female athletes at the University of Pennsylvania, says the school's head athletic trainer, Eric Laudano, M.H.S., ATC.

Disordered Eating and Body Image Issues Among Athletes Rising

Eating disorders affect an estimated 13 to 42% of athletes, depending on sport and gender. The number of reported cases appear to be on the rise as a result of increased public awareness and a greater willingness of athletes to seek treatment.

Neuromuscular Warm-Up Reduces Leg Injuries in Female Athletes At Inner-City High Schools

Implementing a coach-led neuro-muscular warm-up for female high school soccer and basketball players at predominantly low-income, inner city schools is an extremely cost-effective way to reduce the number of non-contact leg injuries, including ACL injuries, among an under-served, at-risk population, a new study finds.

Males At Increased Risk Of Osteoarthritis After ACL Injuries

Male athletes are at increased risk of cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-injured knees, placing them at higher risk of developing the debilitating joint condition osteoarthritis (OA), says a new study presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's 2011 Annual Meeting in San Diego.  A delay to reconstructive surgery did not increase the risk of developing full-thickness cartilage lesions, as long as surgery occurred within 12 months of injury. 
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