Home » subconcussive

subconcussive

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Seven Ways To Reduce Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury In Sports

Brain trauma to youth and high school players in contact and collision sports can occur not just from violent helmet-on-helmet collisions but from repetitive sub-concussive blows.  There are five major ways to reduce exposure to such hits, experts say.

Prominent Researcher Supports Ban On Soccer Heading And Limitations On Heading In Practice At Youth Level

New rules and recommendations regarding heading in youth soccer issued in November 2015 by a number of national and California soccer organizations have generated significant controversy, with some criticizing the rules as going too far and some as not going far enough. Not surprisingly, Dr. Frank Webbe, a prominent researcher on the subject of heading in soccer and a longtime supporter of a ban on heading in soccer below age 14, favors the new rules, despite the lack of data to establish their effectiveness.

Limiting Contact Practices In High School Football: Proceed With Caution, Study Concludes

Limiting or eliminating contact practices in football would result in an 18% to 40% reduction in head impacts respectively over the course of a high school football season, reports a new study,  which urges policymakers to proceed with caution in imposing such limits.

Concussive and Subconcussive Blows May Speed Up Aging of Brain, Studies Suggest

Concussions, and even lesser subconcussive head trauma, may speed up the brain's natural aging process says a new study which found changes in gait, balance, and in the brain's electrical activity in areas measuring attention and impulse control in otherwise healthy college students with a history of concussion.

Heading in Soccer: Long-Term Effect Remains Unclear

While it is possible that intentional heading in soccer represents a form of repetitive subconcussive mild brain injury which, over time,  could be a cause of chronic traumatic encephalpathy (CTE), the possible cause-and-effect relationship remains theoretical, says a 2012 study.

Limiting Hits To Head In Youth Sports Aim of Innovative "Hit Count" Program

The Sports Legacy Institute's  "Hit Count" initiative is designed to dramatically reduce youth athletes' exposure to repetitive brain trauma in multiple sports, with the goal to reduce concussions, sub-concussive trauma and risk of developing Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Ivy League Football: A Trailblazer in Concussion Prevention, Says Penn's Laudano

New rules in place by the Ivy League for the 2011 football season - including a reduction in the number of full-contact practices and drills - were designed to protect student-athletes from subconcussive hits considered a possible cause of long-term brain injury,

NHL Star Had CTE: Degenerative Disease Linked To Repeated Brain Trauma

An autopsy has revealed that former NHL star Rick Martin was suffering from Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease linked to repeated brain trauma.

Ivy League Football Completes First Season Under New Concussion Prevention Rules

The Ivy League adopted groundbreaking new rules for the 2011 football season intended to lower the risk of concussion and the number subconcussive hits, including reducing to two the number of full-contact, in-season practices allowed per week. New research suggests that such repeated hits may cause more brain damage than blows resulting in diagnosed concussions.  

Syndicate content