Return to Play

Quitting Contact or Collision Sport After Concussion: Tough On Family, Not Just Athlete

Retiring from contact or collision sports due to concussion history can be emotionally difficult for both athlete and parent.  Athletes who  play other sports, have clear academic goals, high self-esteem, and supportive and responsible parents fare best.

Study Questions Reliability of Popular Concussion Measurement Tool

A computerized neuropsychological test commonly used to evaluate sports-related concussions misclassified up to 29 percent of healthy participants in a recent test by a University of Texas at Arlington kinesiology researcher.

Paper and Pencil Neuropsychological Testing for Concussions: Valuable But Come with Limitations

Pencil and paper neuropsychological tests have proven useful for identifying cognitive deficits resulting from concussions, and have been available to sports medicine clinicians for years but have a number of limitations.

No Gender Differences In Concussion Severity Or Outcomes Found in High School Sports

High school girls who suffer concussions in sports do not report a greater number of symptoms, take longer for their symptoms to clear, or return to play later than males, says a surprising new study.  But while the severity and outcome of concussions, as measured in the time symptoms take to clear and for athletes to return to play, do not vary by gender, the type of symptoms reported by girls are more subtle and easily missed than those boys report, say the new authors of the study published in the Journal of Athletic Training.

AAP Recommendations On Sport-Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents

Recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on the evaluation and treatment of sport-related concussions in children and adolescents based on the latest consensus of experts.

Concussion Experts Praise, Criticize NJSIAA Guidelines

A panel of renowned medical experts in the field of sports related concussion both praised and criticized the recent concussion policy introduced by the New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association (NJSIAA) at a sports concussion summit.

NFHS Tightens Concussion Rules

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) is implementing a new concussion rule for the 2010-11 academic year which not only requires immediate removal of any athlete suspected of having suffered a concussion but bans his return until cleared to play by an appropriate health-care professional. This rule also covers youth leagues that play under high school rules or modified high school rules, but does not apply in those states where even stricter concussion laws have been recently passed.

New Return-to-Play Concussion Rules Highlight Ice Hockey Rules Changes for 2010-11

New return-to-play rules for concussions rules highlight changes by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) for the 2010-2011 high school ice hockey season.

Concussion Return to Play Guidelines: Longer Recovery Time Needed, Says Doctor

If it was up to Dr. Lester Mayers, young athletes who suffer sports concussions would be not be allowed to return to play (RTP) for 4 to 6 weeks after injury, a significant departure from current concussion guidelines which allow RTP 1 to 2 weeks after an athlete's concussion signs and symptoms clear, both at rest and during exercise.
Syndicate content