Return to Play

Concussion Evaluation and Management: An Overview

Sports concussion neuropsychologist Rosemarie Scolaro Moser, Ph. D. provides an overview of the concussion evaluation and management process leading, hopefully, to a student-athlete's return to sports:

Cognitive Rest After Concussion Critical To Avoiding Extended Recovery

Not only is it important for concussed students to avoid play but they need to avoid cognitive exertion, says the mom of one concussed athlete, which is critical to making a successful recovery at an early point, instead of having it extended, as it was in her daughter Heidi's case.

After Concussion: Return To Play Is Step By Step Process

As soon as an athlete is symptom free, he can start the step by step process towards a return to full game play, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III, starting with light aerobic exercise, and, if concussion symptoms don't recur, to more rigorous aerobic exercise, non-contact practice, full-contact practices, and eventually game play. 

Retiring After Concussions: Athlete's Level of Play, Realistic Long-Term Goals Are Factors

It is reasonable for professional athletes and college athletes with a realistic possibility of a pro career to accept more risk in deciding whether to retire after suffering series of concussions but other athletes should assume less risk, says Dr. William P. Meehan, III.

Concussion Knowledge of Primary Care Doctors Falls Short, Study Says

Many primary care physicians lack confidence in their ability to diagnose and manage concussions, says a new University of Washington study, although doctors receiving a concussion education toolkit were significantly less likely to recommend next day return to play after concussion, consistent with current guidelines.

Concussion Expert Revises Return To Play Guidelines

Pioneering concussion expert, Dr. Robert Cantu, issues revised return to play guidelines focusing on loss of consciousness, post-traumatic amnesia, concussion number, and time signs and symptoms take to clear at rest and with progressive exertion as factors.

Retiring From Sports After Concussion: No Magic Number

Medicine has not yet figured out how many concussions is too many.  The number that leads to permanent deficits in memory, concentration, and other cognitive processes, and/or increases the risk of dementia and other problems later in life, is different for each athlete.

Quitting Contact or Collision Sport After Concussion: Tough On Family, Not Just Athlete

Retiring from contact or collision sports due to concussion history can be emotionally difficult for both athlete and parent.  Athletes who  play other sports, have clear academic goals, high self-esteem, and supportive and responsible parents fare best.

Study Questions Reliability of Popular Concussion Measurement Tool

A computerized neuropsychological test commonly used to evaluate sports-related concussions misclassified up to 29 percent of healthy participants in a recent test by a University of Texas at Arlington kinesiology researcher.
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