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Concussion Definition, Causes and Myths

Is There A "Head Count" for Soccer?

A new study linking frequent heading of a soccer ball with changes to the white matter of the brain and poorer performance on a neurocognitive test of memory is likely to add fuel to the fire of a 30-year-old debate about the effects of heading.

Sports Concussion Myths and Misconceptions

Sports concussion myths are still common, despite increased media focus and education in recent years.

Type or Age of Helmet Does Not Affect Concussion Risk, Research Paper Finds

The risk of sustaining a concussion in high school football is not effected by the brand or age of the helmet or by the type of mouth guard worn, say researchers at the University of Wisconsin.

Migraines As Risk Factor for Prolonged Concussion Recovery

A history of pre-existing migraine headaches may be a risk factor for a concussion and may be associated with a prolonged recovery.

Each Concussion Is Different But All Share Four Characteristics

A "concussion" is the historical term representing low-velocity injuries that cause brain "shaking." The word is derived from the Latin concutere, meaning to shake violently. It is a subset of mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury.

High Concussion Rate in Boys' Lacrosse Blamed On Intentional Head-to-Head Contact With Defenseless Players

Lacrosse may be the fastest-growing high school boy's sport in the United States, but only football and ice hockey have higher concussion rates. A 2013 study pinpoints the possible culprit: widespread and intentional use of helmets during player-to-player contact, often to defenseless players, and usually without a penalty being called.

Concussion Risk Doesn't End with School Year

For an increasing number of kids these days, playing sports doesn't end with the school year.  If anything, the competitive intensity of all-star, tournament, travel ball, and sports camps during summer vacation means increased athletic exposures and risk of concussion.

Concussion Rates in Football, Hockey and Lacrosse Rising

Football still has the highest number of concussions and concussion rate at the high school level, but concussion rates are also high in boys' hockey and lacrosse, and girls' soccer, lacrosse and field hockey, says the most recent study.

Concussions: No Direct Blow to Head or Specific Impact Magnitude Required

A concussion may result from a direct blow to the head, face, neck, or elsewhere on the body where the force of the blow is transmitted to the head. Concussions occur from blows to different parts of the head and of varying magnitude.
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